Category Archives: Desktop

All posts related to desktop ediscovery software.

Courtroom Drama: Trial Presentation Best Practices for the Virtual Courtroom

Trial Presentation Virtual Courtroom

Courtroom Drama: Trial Presentation Best Practices for the Virtual Courtroom

JD Supra Readers Choice Top Author 2020Written by Jim Gill
Content Chief, Ipro

As early as May, the ABA Journal was raising the idea of Virtual Trials becoming a part of the “New Normal,” an oft-used phrase to indicate life moving forward in the aftermath of the global COVID-19 pandemic. Now, three months later, virtual hearings and trials are becoming a regular occurrence, and as they do, challenges arise with them.

This week’s eDiscovery Blues cartoon tries to capture a few of those challenges with our usual combination of levity and insight; in particular, the struggle of an attorney being able to gauge the reactions of various parties while presenting an exhibit on screen. Also, it was hard to pass up the chance to show someone taking advantage of professional attire for the camera, while still rocking shorts and fuzzy slippers off screen.

A Few Basics to Consider for Trial Presentation in the Virtual Courtroom

As most of us become accustomed to video conferencing and remote work, a few things start to become apparent as being necessary.

Second Monitor:

When you move from a real life setting to video, your brain might be expecting the outcome of a multi-camera television production, but the reality ends up something like today’s cartoon. But with Zoom calls, you actually do have multiple camera views to work with. This is where having, at minimum, a second monitor in order to optimize presenting as well as organizing participant and speaker views is crucial.

Backgrounds, Dress Codes, Lighting & Audio:

In the recent congressional hearings with the leaders of Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Apple, one thing that came out of that was an analysis of the speakers’ video presences (There was a great write up about it in the NY Times).

Keeping that in mind, here are some things to consider:

  • Attendees should keep their background simple and neat (backgrounds such as a beach landscape or a galaxy are inappropriate for the courtroom).
  • As dress codes are still required, attire needs to be professional. At least follow the “Zoom mullet” approach – business on the top, party on the bottom.
  • Also consider staying away from striped patterns in clothing. In a recent hearing, one participant was constantly closing his eyes, because another participant’s striped blouse was making him slightly nauseous as the pattern was visually vibrating.
  • Good lighting is also very important. Avoid being backlit. Also avoid dark spaces and shadows, which can add an unintentional, somber mood. Ring lights are more popular than ever and for good reason.
  • If you have to choose between good audio or good video, choose good audio. Investing in a quality mic can have a huge impact.

Opportunities & Challenges for Virtual Trials and Hearings

To get more insight into the current situation, I reached out to Alicia Aquino, who is a Trial Presentation Specialist and Litigation Consultant, for her take.

“Online trials are such a controversial topic; however, we see it CAN be done. Whether you’re in-person or online, organization and preparation are the keys to a seamless trial.”

She goes on to add a few of the challenges she’s currently seeing.

“We are finding that access to technology may be an issue for some states and counties.  In an ideal situation, jurors would use dual monitors during trial. As with an in-person trial, the cost of trial equipment is shared between parties, ensuring all jurors have an adequate set up may be the burden of the parties in the future.

“Another challenge with online trials is the internet speed varies from home to home, and jurors and parties are being dropped, causing delay.  A possible solution may be asking jurors to participate at a public setting (i.e. library or government building) which can accommodate for safe social distancing.

“There is a high level of importance for a technical or ‘IT bailiff’ during an online hearing or trial to assist with the coordination of jurors, breakout rooms, and any other tech issues. This person is trained by the court to handle the back end of the platform and logistics.  Some courts face an issue with the budget of having a full-time person assist with technology.

“Court reporters are being tasked with pulling up exhibits in a deposition; however, having an experienced trial tech will help streamline this process. Let the attorney handle the legal arguments while the tech handles the software and evidence.”

3 More Things to Consider for Trial Presentation in the Virtual Courtroom

For further insight on how to better prepare for virtual courtroom presentation, I turned to Janelle Vindiola, Senior Project Manager for the Ipro Trial Services Team.

    1. Practice, Practice, Practice

Take time for incorporating multiple practice sessions within your own legal team, so they can learn what to expect when presenting visual evidence in a remote environment. Practice sessions can help determine internet connectivity between parties (including witnesses) to allow time for upgrading equipment if needed. And, as the court is usually the web host, allow time for a practice session between court and counsel to understand the court’s expectations and requirements, as well as learning the workflows between all parties.

    1. Organization of Exhibits is Key to a Smooth Presentation

If it is not already part of the process, it is suggested for the legal team to share a daily outline of exhibits to be presented. Because the trial tech does not have the convenience of sitting next to counsel, an outline will help the tech easily follow the counsel’s direction of strategy and on queue to present.

Make sure to have an alternate file sharing application to support distribution, since Zoom has a file size limitation of 512MB. Also, courts are known to disable the chat and breakout rooms in Zoom, so the file sharing function may not even be available.

It is crucial to make sure all parties are on the same application platforms to easily follow group communications and data transfers. For trial teams (including trial techs), they will need to confirm alternate communications and have their own private cloud share as well.

    1. Security is Important

Make rooms private where possible and assign someone to vet participants as they enter the discussion. Zoom has a “waiting room” where people must go before being allowed in as means to prevent “Zoom bombing.” Someone will need to monitor that area for attendees if the proceedings are open to the public.

As web hosting may not be 100% secured, review and understand the security policies of your web application and best workflows. Zoom is constantly updating their security features; make sure everyone has the latest build.

Conclusion

As Alicia Aquino puts it, “The COVID-19 pandemic has created an opportunity for the legal industry to embrace technology and move cases through a virtual space. Although online jury trials are not ideal for long term, it is a viable option until we can all safely enter the same courtroom together. Although most courts are already familiar with Zoom for online hearings, there is an opportunity for a platform to be customized specifically to our industry and online courts.”

While there are certainly other challenges that will continue coming up, a little planning, preparation, and communication can go a long way. Things have definitely changed in the past few months, but it’s exciting to see how our industry is leveraging technology to keep the justice system moving forward.

 

See how TrialDirector 360 can help you make an impact during trial!

TrialDirector 360, by Ipro from Ipro eDiscovery & InfoGov on Vimeo.

 

More than Drawing a Black Box: How to Get Redactions Right for eDiscovery Production

How to Get eDiscovery Redactions Right

More than Drawing a Black Box: How to Get Redactions Right for eDiscovery Production

JD Supra Readers Choice Top Author 2020Written by Jim Gill
Content Chief, Ipro

For most people, redacted documents are the material of spy movies and political scandal. But here in the world of eDiscovery and FOIA requests, they’re a part of everyday life. But that doesn’t mean they’re to be taken lightly! Failure to redact documents or to make sure that redacted content is produced in its redacted format can be case ending (and job ending for the person responsible for the error).

The most common reason this happens, is because law firms and government agencies are taking the “redact by hand” route instead of using tools that properly manage productions to ensure documents meet the expected requirements, making sure the information meant to be kept private is hidden.

Even with redaction technology in place, some file types (like spreadsheet documents) can be difficult to redact, as we see in this week’s eDiscovery Blues™ comic. These challenging file types result in the litigation support or FOIA personnel using Microsoft Office and Adobe Acrobat to draw black boxes over the sensitive material, which is fine if the documents are going to be printed to hardcopy but doesn’t actually redact the digital information from the file.

In one 2019 grand jury filing, a member of the press was able to defeat these types of manually created redactions by simply copying the black-out boxes and pasting the text into a new document, which also brought over the text and metadata.

So how can you make sure redactions on digital documents are done correctly?

“That’s kind of the challenge: picking the right tool for the right job,” says Derek Miller, VP of Business Development at Ipro. “Anyone doing redactions and producing redacted documents needs to understand how these tools work and build measures into their processes to avoid this type of mistake. But mainly you want to make sure you have the right tools in your toolbox. Which means using software that’s specifically designed to redact and produce those redactions accurately.”

Here are a few things to look for in software to ensure accurately produced redactions:

  • Automatically re-OCRs documents to remove the text under the redaction
  • Runs validations to make sure the redactions are burned in and the text is correct
  • Creates layered redactions so multiple production sets can be sent to multiple parties

Along with those functions, some eDiscovery software has added protections which identify documents which may need another layer of review before they’re produced. It’s similar to when your email platform asks if you want to send without a subject line or asks if you’ve forgotten an attachment.

One example of this is Ipro’s Production Shield™, which identifies these documents during the validation phase of the export process, giving administrators the opportunity to correct conflicts and ensure only appropriate documents are produced.

The main thing to remember when dealing with Electronically Stored Information (ESI) is that what you see on the screen is only the surface of the existing data. The same goes getting redactions right for eDiscovery: Just because all you see is a black box, doesn’t mean everything that lies beneath has disappeared.

Ipro’s Production Shield™ is available on Ipro’s Enterprise™ and Desktop™ eDiscovery Solutions.

More Cases, Less Effort: How eDiscovery Technology Enables the Small & Mid-Sized Law Firm

eDiscovery Mid-Sized Law Firm

More Cases, Less Effort: How eDiscovery Technology Enables the Small & Mid-Sized Law Firm

Paul, Plevin, Sullivan & Connaughton (PPS&C) LLP was formed in 1998 by four partners who specialize in Labor and Employment litigation.  Now with 29 lawyers devoted to defending and advising employers, Paul Plevin is recognized as one of California’s top management-side labor and employment law firms, representing employers in discrimination, harassment, wrongful termination, trade secret, union-management, and other employment-related matters throughout California and, increasingly, nationwide.

Whitney Farrell is a paralegal at PPS&C, and one of five people who act as a small eDiscovery department within the firm. Along with two members of the IT department, this team knows the benefit of Ipro solutions and work cohesively when starting the process of eDiscovery.

As Whitney puts it, “We are a mid-sized firm, and Ipro is great for our needs, being instrumental in allowing our five paralegals to quickly intake documents on the fly. With the ability to work harmoniously between programs, we utilize Ipro’s eDiscovery tools daily. Then, for the two or three times a year as we prepare for arbitration or trial, we can tie everything together in TrialDirector.”

Leveraging Technology to Streamline the eDiscovery Workflow

Ten years ago, Paul Plevin used Adobe to manage case documents, then moved to an earlier Ipro product, eScanit, along with Concordance, but the firm was growing, and so were document counts. They needed a complete suite of products that would allow them to process, review, and produce documents.

As Whitney stated, “Litigation moves fast, and Ipro continues to keep up with the pace. Now our paralegals are able to streamline the intake process and speed through any processing jobs, allowing our attorneys to review as soon as possible.”

She continues, “Ipro’s processing engine allows us to all work within the controller at one time, which has helped tremendously with workflow. Previously, we had workstations set up in a separate office, so we would have to physically change locations to process any jobs. Now, with a single, centralized controller on all of our computers, we are able to work from our desks. This has greatly improved our workflow, and we all process so much faster now. Attorneys also love Ipro for desktop and responded positively when we transitioned from our previous vendor. Now, the staff are able to perform document review quickly and easily.”

Scaling for a Variety of Cases and Clients

Case size can vary greatly depending on the matter, and the need to scale becomes vital. For example, union arbitration cases are relatively small, often with only a few hundred documents, and come and go quickly. At the same time, staff may get a special request to look at a plaintiff’s emails in their entirety (e.g. 10 years of emails, 150k+ documents), which will exponentially grow the database.

During a complaint involving a hospital – which was originally filed in December of 2013, when they were still using Concordance – PPS&C decided to migrate to Ipro solutions. Moving 10k documents was seamless, and attorneys were able to manage the case quickly, as well as now being able to import documents into TrialDirector for the trial.

“The fact that we were able to easily switch software in the middle of an ongoing case, which we then won, says a lot,” according to Whitney.  “This same case was recently called back on appeal, and when we opened the case in the software, it was all still easily accessible, and we were ready to move forward immediately.”

Not only does Ipro provide the power and scalability to handle large electronic datasets, transferring files sent via email, file transfer, or hard drive, it also has the flexibility to deal with legacy files. In one recent case involving a professor who had been at his university for 25 years, Paul Plevin received boxes of paper documents dropped at their offices. But with Ipro, they were able to scan them directly, utilizing the powerful processing engine, and immediately prepare the attorneys for review.

“A One-Stop-Shop”

When asked what she likes most about Ipro, Whitney responded, “Everything I need is in one place, and all the products work so well together. It breaks everything down into a straightforward, three-step process: processing, administration, and review. Ipro is truly a one-stop-shop. And the post-processing Quality Control (QC) module – which we always use whether the dataset is a single page or a thousand emails – allows us to keep clean, clutter-free, accurate databases, keeping attorneys from wasting time with bad data, and instead, has them quickly moving into review.”

“And besides the software,” Whitney adds, “Ipro’s tech support and training teams are amazing. I’m always able to get the help I need to solve any problem. Ipro makes our process quick and effective, allowing us to save time and take on additional cases without additional effort. It was so easy to make the switch, our attorneys love it, and we haven’t looked back.”

Want to learn more about how Ipro helps small and mid-sized law firms
use technology to compete with the AmLaw 200?

Listen to this webinar with PPS&C’s Whitney Farrell and and Wilson, Turner, Kosmo’s Justin Peña

 3 New Reasons to be an Ipro Certified Administrator

 3 New Reasons to be an Ipro Certified Administrator

We know you’re adjusting to the global crisis, which is why, in these uncertain times, we’re introducing a new way to become an Ipro Certified Administrator through our new Virtual Instructor-Led Web Series.

“We know that education is the key to customer success and that hasn’t changed,” says Julie Badger, Product Learning Experience manager for Ipro. “The adjustments we’ve made to the course structure, to facilitate distance learning, are our way of showing our community we are with you.”

This training is for you if you want to:

  • Be a best in class Ipro Administrator
  • Optimize your workflow
  • Exceed business objectives
  • Leverage advanced tools like a pro
  • Reduce project start to completion time

Available for Ipro for enterprise, Ipro for desktop TrialDirector 360, TrialDirector 6.8, and Eclipse SE, each web series is comprised of 3-4 sessions, making it easier than ever to get certificated with:

1. Less Time
There’s no need to be away from the office for two full business days. Our new Virtual Instructor-Led Web Series now happens conveniently online and in smaller, three-hour intervals.

2. Less Money
Now there’s less pressure on the bottom line. Because the Ipro Administrator Web Series is less expensive for us to run, we can pass the savings on to you.

3. More Skills
We leverage the proven Hear, See, Do learning method so you get the most value out of your learning experience. Our lecture-based format is followed by exercises designed to help you dive deep into the product and learn at your own pace.

Now more than ever, it’s time to hone your skills and sharpen the blade – and stay healthy and safe.

Plus, you’ll learn from the best as the training team guides you through the product using their many years of experience in the eDiscovery field.

“We can’t wait to meet you and help you up your Ipro eDiscovery game,” Badger adds.

Learn More Now

Upcoming Webinar! Learn why Ipro for desktop is the future of small-footprint eDiscovery solutions

Ipro for desktop

Upcoming Webinar! Learn why Ipro for desktop is the future of small-footprint eDiscovery solutions

The small law firm is often left out of the eDiscovery conversation. Faced with choosing an enterprise tool, sticking with legacy eDiscovery software that is no longer being developed, or the old standby, manual processes, it might seem that small firms are left little in the way of eDiscovery options.

Say hello to Ipro for desktop!

Ipro for desktop gives you BigLaw power with Small Firm overhead. This is a true all-in-one litigation platform, allowing you to effortlessly manage reviews, ingest native files, and accurately produce documents. You can also build case strategy using the fact management tool and prepare presentation in TrialDirector360.

For an in-depth look at how Ipro for desktop can help your legal team through the litigation lifecycle from discovery to trial, join Ipro’s VP of desktop solutions Derek Miller for an upcoming product webinar, December 18th at 1pm EST.

In addition to discovery, Derek will discuss how our customers are taking advantage of Ipro’s feature-rich product to handle employee disputes, as well as subpoena and FOIA requests, with the added ability to work offline for continued productivity.

Are you already working with a legacy eDiscovery platform? Find out how migrating cases from a variety of other systems is a simple and straightforward process.

Register now!

 

What Percentage of Your Cases Go to Trial Each Year?

Percentage of Cases Go To Trial

 

What Percentage of Cases Go to Trial?

In a recent Ipro survey, 68% of respondents said that less than 5% of their cases go to trial each year. This probably isn’t a surprise to those of us working in the legal industry. For many, the goal is absolutely that: get to a resolution as quickly as possible and skip trial all together. Because of this, a large portion of legal teams working in the eDiscovery space don’t ever consider tools that are designed for fact management and trial presentation. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t a place for them outside of the courtroom.

Percentage of Cases Go To Trial

For example, whether or not a case goes to trial, the legal team has to build a strategy around the facts and the evidence. A fact management tool allows a legal team to connect those facts with specific pieces of evidence or custodians, along with annotations by attorneys or lit support, so they can begin building a case strategy while conducting document review.

Another example of using trial-based tools before trial is presentation software. Often, presentation software can be connected directly to your fact management tool, allowing a legal team to present the strategy or case during mediation, at a meet and confer conference, or any other time where they may need present key elements of the case (including documents with highlights and call-outs, or video deposition clips) in a clear and organized fashion.

That’s where a solution like Ipro for desktop comes in: it’s a full eDiscovery processing and review tool with built-in fact management (Case Story) and trial presentation (TrialDirector 360) components, allowing for a seamless workflow from data ingestion through eDiscovery to presentation. So if you never see the inside of a courtroom, or a large percentage of your cases end up at trial, eDiscovery and Trial technology can level the playing field for your firm.

 

 


Ipro for desktop

Request a Demo of Ipro for Desktop Today

What Should Be in the Small Law Firm eDiscovery Toolbox: The Lawyerist Interviews Derek Miller

small law firm eDiscovery

The small law firm is often left out of the eDiscovery conversation. Faced with choosing an enterprise tool, sticking with legacy eDiscovery software that is no longer being developed, or the old standby, manual processes, it might seem that small firms are left little in the way of eDiscovery options.

But that isn’t the case. Recently, The Lawyerist interviewed Derek Miller, VP of Desktop Solutions at Ipro, on several of their podcasts, talking about just that: eDiscovery tools small law firms should keep in their toolboxes.

Why Do Small Firms Need to Care About eDiscovery?

Derek Miller: I have a firm that I work with here in Phoenix, a small firm, two attorneys and two paralegals. And they’ve decided to use technology from start to finish. From the first meeting with a client, they start a chronology on what they’re going to produce, and what they’re getting from opposing counsel. And they start with electronically created information and images, which means someone has to process it and work with it. So they use our desktop software to ingest that information, review, and produce it. They also manage their transcripts and synchronized video, and they build the entirety of their case through the use of this technology.

At every stage, they’re reviewing, producing, scanning, coding data, and putting it into a product that will allow them to then take all of that information and transition it through the litigation life cycle and then go into trial and present that information. Ironically, everyone has to prepare as if they’re going to trial; whether or not they end up there is dependent upon the case. And because they’re using technology at every stage, they’re already familiar with the facts all the way through, solidifying their strategy.

Lawyerist: They don’t have to wait until pre-trial, or even discovery, they’re ready to go from the beginning of the intake process. That sounds like a pretty powerful way to approach trial prep and litigation in general.

Derek Miller: I think so. And because they’ve adopted the software and are using it through the whole process, they don’t have to relearn it each time when they get to a certain stage. It’s just a natural part of the practice.

Lawyerist: How would a firm get started using technology like that?

Derek Miller: That’s a great question. First, go out and evaluate a couple of different products, decide what it is that you’re trying to do, and then how a particular software fits that goal.

Secondarily, I would invest heavily in the training. Once you become familiar with the software, then make that a part of your workflow.

Fact Management:

Lawyerist: What’s a tool that you think should be in every litigator’s toolbox?

Derek Miller: I think one of the tools that can be really helpful, and that’s a little bit underrated, is a Fact management tool.

Lawyerist: What is a fact management tool?

Derek Miller: It’s a tool that bridges the gap between the discovery/production phase of litigation and the trial phase. And with every case, you should be preparing as if you are going to trial, even if you don’t ultimately end up in the courtroom.

Lawyerist: I’m imagining that a fact management tool uses key facts, material facts, extraneous facts, as the central organizing principle, and my assumption is that it helps me organize what those facts are and identify why they might matter, helping me draw connections between them.

Derek Miller: Yeah, I think one way to think about a fact management tool is it’s like one of those photographic mosaics, where you’re trying to take a bunch of those little individual pictures and turn it into one big picture. And with litigation, you start with one big picture in mind, and then with all the little pictures you’re given, you try and paint it so it’s accurate and clearly seen. Sometimes that’s harder to do, because you’re stuck with all these little pieces of evidence, and you have to align those with all of the facts and issues of the case. A fact management tool can help you do that. You have to have the ability to manage witnesses, documents, testimony, and a chronology, and the ability to visualize “what happened when” is a key part of painting that picture.

Lawyerist: You just mentioned a chronology, what are some other key features you want to look for in a fact management tool.

Derek Miller: Something that ties together facts and the evidence that goes with it, whether that is a document, an email, a video, a transcript testimony from a deposition, any of those are all key pieces you want to manage. Additionally, you don’t want a tool that’s a bridge to nowhere. And what I mean by that, is that it would be great if all the effort and work product was going to transition easily into whatever you’re going to use for trial.

Lawyerist: Because the idea here, is that whenever I see a fact, it’s providing me with the additional context. So I know what that fact means, what the significance is, if it turns out to exist or not exist, if the fact is disproved or proved, and what that means for my case, and what are the documents I’m going to need to prove it up or disprove it.

Derek Miller: You’re right, and then which witness is going to testify and who’s going to introduce that evidence to help you out.

Lawyerist: Is this something that will work with my presentation software, or is this just something I would use myself on my laptop at my desk?

Derek Miller: It could be either/or. As I mentioned earlier, it could be something that’s going to transition that work product right into the trial software, so that if you do end up in the courtroom, you’re not redoing that work. It’s all going along for the ride.

Lawyerist: And that’s the philosophy behind Ipro, right? It’s something you begin using at the beginning of the case that helps you along the way, and then it also turns into a fact management tool as you need it to be, and it also helps you present your case at trial, and handles the whole lifecycle of the case.

Derek Miller: Exactly. We’re all about simplifying that entire process, from the start of discovery all the way through trial.

Redaction Woes:

Lawyerist: You were telling me about some PDF redaction disasters you were seeing recently that show what happens when you use software correctly, but for a purpose which it was not intended. Tell us what you’ve seen.

Derek Miller: Recently in the news, there was the story of the redacted information that was erroneously or accidentally exposed because of the tools that were used to do the redaction. It’s probably not the first or last time that will happen, but in this instance, it was an issue of understanding how the technology works versus the software itself, and that can be the bigger problem when it comes to selecting tools for the toolbox.

Lawyerist: So in this case, remind me, what was the situation and what was the tool that went wrong?

Derek Miller: Basically, the situation was they went through and they redacted some grand jury information, and the software did work as it was intended, and it did redact, but that doesn’t mean it was permanent or fixed, so an outside party was able to highlight, copy, and paste, and then show that redacted information in another document.

Lawyerist: This was the kind of situation where, someone drew black boxes over the document, which works if you’re going to print it, but doesn’t actually redact the digital information from the file.

Derek Miller: Correct. When you have an image or text, you can put a black box over it all you want, but the underlying data is still there. So while they did choose a redaction tool, they didn’t double check to make sure the information wasn’t still available.

Lawyerist: So how can lawyers make sure that when they are redacting PDF documents or other digital documents, they’re doing it correctly.

Derek Miller: That’s kind of the challenge: picking the right tool for the right job. Based on this recent experience, anyone doing redactions and producing redacted documents is going to understand how those tools work and be a little more careful so they avoid this type of mistake. But mainly you want to make sure you have the right tool in your toolbox. So use software that’s specifically designed to redact and produce those redactions accurately. And as far as the functionality of the software, you want to make sure it does a couple of things like automatically re-OCR the document to remove the text under the redaction, run validations to make sure the redactions are burned in and the text is correct, and then be able to create layered redactions so that multiple production sets can be sent to multiple parties.

In addition to those functions, in the Ipro for enterprise and Ipro for desktop products, there is a feature called Production Shield which identifies those types of documents that need that added layer of review before they’re produced.

Lawyerist: Which can keep you from making mistakes. Kind of like the email feature that reminds you when you’ve forgotten to attach something.

Derek Miller: Exactly. In a similar way that your email will ask, “Are you sure you want to send?” or “Did you mean to attach documents?” Production Shield works in a similar way where it says, hey, you may want to check these documents to make sure the redaction is correct and there’s no underlying text that could inadvertently get disclosed.

Lawyerist: That sounds pretty handy! Thanks so much for being with us today, Derek.

Derek Miller: Thank you.

 

Find out how 5 legal teams overcame their challenges, utilizing Ipro’s Hybrid approach to eDiscovery.

Download the eDiscovery Adventure Guide Today!

Ipro eDiscovery Adventure Guide

Having Trouble Navigating the Unpredictable Waters of eDiscovery?

eDiscovery adventure guide

Ipro’s eDiscovery Adventure Guide

Find out how 5 legal teams overcame their challenges, utilizing Ipro’s Hybrid approach to eDiscovery.

There are a lot of stakeholders and processes involved in eDiscovery, which makes it an extremely complex adventure. For many years, people said that with the right software, you could handle everything. But software alone isn’t enough. That’s why you need a technology partner to help navigate the unpredictable waters of eDiscovery.

When software isn’t enough: Data continues to grow in size and complexity, and the need for that data in investigations and litigation is now a daily occurrence. For an agile response, innovative approaches to eDiscovery are necessary, and rather than trying to go at it alone, forward-thinking legal teams will look toward a hybrid approach.

Download the eDiscovery Adventure Guide Today!

Ipro eDiscovery Adventure Guide

5 Reasons Your Legal Team is Being Held Back by Legacy eDiscovery Software

legacy eDiscovery software

We’ve all been there: we know we need to change our way of doing things but are stuck in the status quo. We tell ourselves, if it isn’t broken, why fix it, because the thought of going through the difficulty of evolving often overshadows any benefits that might come with updating.

Those of us working in eDiscovery are no different. Even as digital information is constantly growing, file types changing, and processing and review costs continue rising, we hang onto outdated software that becomes more and more unstable with age—from limited processing capabilities, issues with filetype compatibility, or a lack of continued development and support.

Here are 5 reasons why continued use of unsupported legacy software is a ticking time bomb in your eDiscovery process.

  1. Tech Support

This is an obvious one. Using legacy eDiscovery software that is no longer supported by the company that created it is like driving a car with high-mileage and no warranty: it may still run fine and get you from point A to point B, but when it breaks down, you’re on your own.

  1. Operating System Support

As far as digital lifespans go, 5 years is a long time. If your legal team is using legacy eDiscovery software which was created for older versions of an OS, it could lead to issues if it’s no longer being supported to meet with scheduled OS updates. (For example, Microsoft released Windows 10 in 2015, which has had 7 additional versions updates since then, with various “end of service” dates scheduled in 2020).

  1. File-type support

It’s no secret that data is growing exponentially each year, particularly in the corporate sector. From an eDiscovery standpoint, the challenge lies with the near infinite number of file types (and variations within each type) in which data can live. Every program and application you use creates different file types: email, chat, social media, planning and content-creation tools, etc. Different versions of the same program or application create variations of those file types, and different formatting within each of those can create still more variations. From this perspective, it’s easy to see why a legal team needs software that is continually being updated in order to keep up with this growth.

  1. Lack of advanced tools and analytics for today’s workflows

More and more, legal teams are looking to add the latest tools which increase the speed, accuracy, and efficiency of document search and review. If your team is using software that is no longer being developed or supported, you may be missing out on the latest innovations in Early Case Assessment (ECA), Technology Assisted Review (TAR), and other advanced technology which allows your team to deal with larger datasets and take on more complex cases.

  1. Difficulty meeting unique production requirements

FRCP Rule 34(b) states that a requesting party may specify the form or forms of ESI production, which are determined by the parties at the Rule 26(f) “meet and confer” conference. The inability to meet unique production requirements due to outdated or unsupported software will result in having to turn to outside service providers to do the job for you, resulting in extra costs and added stakeholders, in order to meet the production deadline.

Functional Software isn’t a Long-Term Solution

It’s time to stop struggling with legacy eDiscovery tools. Ipro easily migrates data from the most popular legacy flat-file review databases and has been purpose-built with the most cutting-edge features in eDiscovery. No matter what your eDiscovery needs are, Ipro has the flexibility, scalability, and value to meet them.

 

Register for Ipro’s upcoming webinar:

eDiscovery from the Trenches: 3 Veteran Practitioners Discuss How to Create a Successful eDiscovery Workflow

Salt Lake Legal Takes on Bigger Cases, Expands Market Share with Ipro Technology Partnership

Salt Lake Legal and Ipro

Salt Lake Legal Takes on Bigger Cases, Expands Market Share with Ipro Technology Partnership

A Proven Partnership

Since 2001, Salt Lake Legal has provided legal support services to law firms and businesses in Utah and throughout the West. From document production, scanning, or electronic discovery, Salt Lake Legal has supported corporate legal teams, large law firms, and solo-practitioners with exceptional legal services.
Salt Lake Legal has used Ipro products for more than a decade, most recently moving to Ipro’s advanced cloud review technology for enterprise clients, giving them the power to take on larger, more complex cases.

Flexibility and Consistency

Even with these changes, Salt Lake Legal’s workflow didn’t change at all. The flexibility of Ipro allowed them to keep their current processes while giving them the confidence that they could easily handle the largest datasets. This eDiscovery power coupled with Ipro’s stellar back office support proved invaluable.

Advanced Analytics and AI

In one instance, Ipro’s advanced analytics and machine learning capabilities helped Salt Lake Legal land a particular case with millions of documents, because Ipro’s TAR functionality helped them quickly cull the data.

“Now more than ever, clients are asking about the TAR feature. Its ability to cull huge data sets really makes a difference in our ability to land bigger cases. Clients also really like the Ipro interface. It’s intuitive and user-friendly, and users can be up and running with it after one run-through on a one-hour web training.”

Shane Bawden, Salt Lake Legal                 Salt Lake Legal and Ipro

A Technology Partner to Grow With

Ipro’s ability to handle growth in the industry, both with technological advances and their ability to support clients, is the reason Salt Lake Legal continues their technology partnership with Ipro year after year.

 

Find out more about how Ipro can partner with your organization to simplify the process from Discovery to Trial.