Category Archives: Enterprise

Watch Ipro in 2020

In the eDiscovery industry, few can truly execute the practical application of software and processes to help you get your work done quickly and effectively.

That’s why you should check out Ipro in 2020!

Ipro offers proven, battle tested eDisocvery software bundled as a solution and deployed the way you want it – Cloud, On-Prem, Desktop, or Hybrid. We also offer a variety of managed services, including processing & hosting, workflow and case management, as well as trial engagements. That is what makes Ipro more than a software vendor. We’re a true technology partner for your day to day needs.

Flexible, Scalable, Powerful.

New Webinar! Learn How Ipro for Enterprise Reduces Risk & Cost for Corporations

January 23, 2020, 1pm EST

Join Ipro’s Director of Product, Aaron Swenson, as he reviews the all NEW Ipro for enterprise, and how it helps corporations quickly respond to subpoena requests, complex litigation, and internal investigations, while reducing overall cost and risk..

In this webinar showcase you will learn:

  • How your legal team can reduce risk and costs by culling irrelevant documents and intellectual property sent to outside counsel
  • How the latest in AI, Advanced Analytics, and Data Visualization help your team quickly uncover facts in ways that would be impossible with traditional linear search
  • How the new consumer-modeled interface empowers internal and external legal teams to effortlessly collaborate while maintaining a high degree of data security and compliance

Flexible, Scalable, Powerful
Ipro for enterprise can be deployed on-premises, in the cloud, or a hybrid, giving you absolute flexibility to manage environments and hosting costs.

New Webinar! Learn How the All New Ipro for Enterprise is Perfect for Law Firms

January 21, 2020, 1pm EST

Join Ipro’s Director of Product, Aaron Swenson, as he reviews the all NEW Ipro for enterprise, and how it helps law firms locate and understand key case evidence, efficiently run a well-organized legal team, and craft a winning case strategy.

In this webinar showcase you will learn:

  • How your team can upload evidence using Self-Service to quickly ingest, assess, report, and stream millions of documents directly into document review
  • How the latest in AI, Advanced Analytics, and Data Visualization help your team quickly uncover facts in ways that would be impossible with traditional linear search
  • How the new consumer-modeled interface for Review creates efficient document viewing and tagging, with single-click access to document batches, ensuring your team will avoid reviewer document collision.

Flexible, Scalable, Powerful
Ipro for enterprise can be deployed on-premises, in the cloud, or a hybrid, giving you absolute flexibility to manage environments and hosting costs.

Register Now!

It’s Game On! Ipro Releases new enterprise eDiscovery solution

new Ipro for enterprise

Ipro is excited to announce the release of its new Ipro for enterprise eDiscovery solution. Intuitive and easy-to-use, Ipro for enterprise helps legal teams locate and understand key data, quickly respond to subpoena requests, complex litigation, and internal investigations, and craft a winning litigation strategy, all while reducing overall cost and risk.

“I’m very excited to deliver this release,” says Aaron Swenson, Product Director for Ipro. “There is something for everyone. It significantly raises our user interface bar, and we are one step closer to our vision of reviewers spending zero time on product-specific training, enabling them to spend 100% of their time focused on the case.” He adds, “The geek in me is just as excited to announce our initial offering of APIs, giving our more technical users a new way to engage with the product, with more to come in this area next release. All of this is a result of our customer feedback groups: we couldn’t have done it without you!”

Other New Features:

  • 1 Click access to review sets lets reviewers focus on learning about the case, not the tool
  • AI/Advanced Analytics reduce review burden up to 95% over traditional document review
  • 15x faster processing over traditional approaches, covering more than 500 file types
  • Cost predictability through straight-forward, competitive pricing.

Upload Evidence

Your team can upload Electronically Stored Information (ESI) using Self-Service to quickly ingest, assess, report, and stream millions of documents directly into document review, placing powerful processing capabilities at the point of need while providing visibility into processing job status and completion.

Uncover & Understand

Use AI, Advanced Analytics, and Data Visualization to quickly uncover facts in ways that would be impossible with traditional linear search. These advanced analytics combine concept, timeline, and relationship searches with data visualization tools to provide deeper insight into communication patterns, allowing you to efficiently cull irrelevant documents before sending to review.

Review & Produce

The document reviewer puts the document at the center of attention, allowing you to focus on the work at hand. The modern, consumer-modeled interface creates efficient document viewing and tagging and provides single-click access to document batches, ensuring your team will avoid reviewer document collision.

Flexible, Scalable, Powerful

Ipro for enterprise can be deployed on-premises, in the cloud, or a hybrid, giving you absolute flexibility to manage environments and hosting costs.

For deep insight into case evidence, where and when you need it, schedule a demo today and learn how easy it is to start using Ipro for enterprise.

Is eDiscovery Existing in a Post-Sanctions World?

eDiscovery Sanctions

Is eDiscovery Existing in a Post-Sanctions World?

The short (and obvious) answer is no. Rule 37(e) isn’t going anywhere. But recent case law indicates a trend where sanctions seem to be harder to come by, which may play into what concerns in-house legal teams as they consider the technologies they may need.

A recent infographic, General Counsel: From Lawyers to Strategic Partners (released by Raconteur with data from Walters Kluwer) showed 66% of corporate legal teams saying “Data Breaches and Protection of corporate data” was a top issue keeping them up at night. Sanctions didn’t even make the list.

Recent case law from 2019 supports the lack of sanction fear, as several cases showed that even when evidence was deleted (sometimes knowingly), courts aren’t doling out sanctions in the same way since the 2015 amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP) went into effect.

As a refresher, Rule 37(e) of the FRCP lays out the threshold for sanctions as follows:

If Electronically Stored Information (ESI) was lost because:

A party didn’t take reasonable steps to preserve it when they should have (i.e. because they knew litigation was imminent)

  • and if the lost ESI can’t be restored or replaced by simply doing discovery again
  • and if there was an intent to deprive the party of information by the loss of the ESI
  • and if the lost ESI actually affects the outcome of the case

…then the court may consider sanctions.

The following examples show that consider is a key word, even when they find the threshold has been met, as in case 3.

United States et al. v. Supervalu, Inc. et al. Nov. 18, 2019 (C.D. Ill. 2019)

Three days after a subpoena, a district pharmacy manager for the defendant sent out an email stating, “Throw away all your competitor’s price matching lists and get rid of all signs that say we match prices.”

The plaintiff alleges there are inconsistencies in both the number and timing of the subsequent litigation holds and accordingly asked the Court for an in-camera review of the three litigation holds which were eventually sent. The plaintiff also believes that the defendant failed to preserve price matching materials responsive to the government subpoena from approximately 80% of their pharmacies nationwide.

But the Court denied sanctions, stating, “Upon reviewing the record, the Court is unable to conclude that Defendants acted in bad faith. If the evidence at trial shows otherwise and bad faith on the part of the Defendants is established, the Court can revisit the issue and consider one or both of the sanctions requested by the Relators or another appropriate sanction.”

Mafille v. Kaiser-Francis Oil Co. May 21, 2019 (N.D. Okla. 2019)

In this case, the plaintiff’s computer was wiped after her termination as part of standard retention policy. When the plaintiff filed for spoliation sanctions, the Court found that the plaintiff’s computer contents were uploaded daily onto the defendant’s LAN server as part of a company policy. So even if her computer were destroyed, the contents could potentially be retrieved if discovery were done on the LAN server. Also, the defendant requested which documents were vital for the plaintiff’s case so they could attempt to retrieve them from the LAN server, but the plaintiff never identified any such items.

Univ. Accounting Serv., LLC v. Schulton. June 7, 2019 (D. Or. 2019)

In this case, the defendant admitted, “I recognize fully that was in violation of the subpoena,” and later said of one particular piece of data, “I deleted the file as fast as I could, because I was petrified at its existence, because it’s exactly the type of damning information that UAS wants to catch me with.”

In US District Judge Michael H. Simon’s Ruling, he states that the Rule 37(e) sanction thresholds “have been satisfied.” Yet, even after meeting the threshold conditions, the judge didn’t order case termination sanctions, but instead chose a permissive inference spoliation instruction against the defendant.

No Sanctions, Why Worry?

Without the specter of sanctions haunting the dreams of in-house legal, does this mean they’ll finally get a good night’s sleep?

Only if they have the processes and technology to manage the exponential growth of data sizes and new file types, which continues to be one of the biggest challenges for corporations, particularly for in-house legal teams who are tasked with mitigating risk involved with enterprise data. To do this, the ability to manage data in a flexible and scalable manner is vital.

Sending a legal hold notice is pretty straightforward. Gaining meaningful and speedy insight into petabytes of data from multiple file types for investigations and subpoenas is much more complex, and forward-looking legal teams are putting their technology to work doing just that.

 

Written by Jim Gill
Content Writer, Ipro

A first step in this process is to use Ipro’s Pre-Litigation Data Checklist as a guide to effectively manage enterprise data in order to avoid potential data pitfalls in the middle of a matter.

Download the Ipro Pre-Litigation Data Inventory Checklist

Ipro Pre-Litigation Data Checklist

New Study Shows In-House Legal as Strategic Enterprise Partners

In-House Legal enterprise partners

New Study Shows In-House Legal as Strategic Enterprise Partners

In a recent stat-filled infographic, General Counsel: From Lawyers to Strategic Partners (released by Raconteur with data from Walters Kluwer), large shifts with in-house corporate legal teams are showing from as recently as two years ago.

One of the main changes is in-house legal departments are becoming valued partners within large enterprises and are increasingly being called upon for their input on business decisions. From data privacy management to regulatory risk mitigation, general counsels now provide a host of vital services for companies to compete in today’s uncertain business environment.

For example, in 2017 the biggest priority for corporate legal departments was improving internal efficiency. This year’s respondents overwhelmingly said that adding to the business and becoming a strategic business partner was their main priority. This is probably a result of the C-Suite seeing the legal department’s ability to bring significant strategic and economic impact to the company as a whole through the use of technology.

Another big arena of change was the priority of data security and data privacy shifting away from in-house legal teams in 2019. This isn’t to say that data management is no longer a priority for companies as a whole but could be a result of more and more corporations creating separate departments focused solely on data, allowing legal to focus on risk mitigation, internal investigations, and compliance.

But even with the growth of in-house legal, only 14% of eDiscovery work was done internally, with the rest being outsourced to traditional or specialist law firms or to alternative legal services providers (ALSP). As companies continue putting a focus on how legal teams can contribute more to business needs overall, this could be a significant area of savings. However, in order to do this, in-house teams will have to develop mature eDiscovery processes and workflows as well as invest in eDiscovery technology.

To read even more statistics regarding corporate in-house legal teams,
Download the Full Infographic!

Written by Jim Gill, Content Writer, Ipro

AI in eDiscovery: Expectations vs. Reality

AI in eDiscovery

AI in eDiscovery: Expectations vs. Reality

There are a lot of claims of “Artificial Intelligence” in the market, but when people hear the term AI, they often think of science-fiction, with robots doing the work that humans had done before. But as Aaron Swenson, Director of Product at Ipro, says:

“In Legal, you don’t want the AI doing the work for you. You want it to help you ask the right questions, show you insightful trends in the data.”

AI in eDiscovery, by Ipro

Download this white-paper to learn
How AI can help you streamline
your eDiscovery process & reduce costs

4 Challenges When Conducting an Enterprise eDiscovery Data Inventory

enterprise eDiscovery data challenges

4 Challenges When Conducting an Enterprise eDiscovery Data Inventory

An important first step to help corporate counsel and their departments more efficiently manage enterprise eDiscovery data before litigation arises, is understanding your organization’s data landscape in order to avoid potential data pitfalls in the middle of a matter.

The challenge lies with the near infinite number of file types (and variations within each type) in which data can live. Every program and application you use creates different file types: email, chat, social media, planning and content-creation tools, etc. Different versions of the same program or application create variations of those file types, and different formatting within each of those can create still more variations.

Here are 4 Data Challenges any enterprise should discuss with their IT Director and eDiscovery Manager, so that they can begin a data inventory and put policies in place ahead of litigation, which will greatly cut down on roadblocks later.

  1. The Fringes – Legacy and Bleeding Edge

Have you ever cleaned out your closet and found that shoebox full of cassettes from college? Businesses are no different. Many of their electronic files are stored as legacy file types which are no longer supported. A great example is one company who needed to review files which were saved on 8-inch floppy disks! Knowing this ahead of litigation is important.

On the other end of that spectrum, being on the forefront of technology is great, but when it comes to preparing files for eDiscovery, it can slow things down. Similar to knowing about legacy files, it’s also important to take note of recently developed software or applications your organization may use which creates unique file types.

  1. New Data Sources – Mobile, IM, and Social Media (Oh My!)

Mobile devices can be difficult when it comes to eDiscovery for many reasons. They contain a large variety of file-types and data intermingled with a lot of private information, which may be privileged. Extracting specific information can be difficult and imaging an entire device can be costly. This is why it’s important to have policies in place to determine how mobile devices are used for business purposes.

Organizations are also relying on messaging platforms (Slack, Teams, and What’s App are good examples) and social media to conduct business. Data can usually be requested from the source company (For example, Instagram has a data request form in its Privacy and Security settings), but it can be difficult to put into a review-ready format. So, knowing if these platforms are a potential source of data—should litigation arise—is important.

  1. The Oddballs – Unsupported Data Files

Besides the file types listed here, there are a myriad of other unsupported file types which may come into play (A good example are CAD files used by an architecture or construction company). Because they are used every day by members of an organization, the fact that they may be difficult to process for review may not be considered in the event of legal action.

  1. Size Matters – Understanding Your Organization’s Overall Dataset

Besides knowing the file types your organization may use, knowing the size of that data is also difficult to capture, especially with the exponential growth of electronic information each year. Doing a data inventory will give you an idea of how much data is created for a given amount of time, as well as how much of that data may be ROT (Redundant, Obsolete, Trivial).

It’s easy to get stuck in a “that’s the way we’ve always done it” mentality, but eDiscovery data challenges shouldn’t get in the way of your enterprise legal team’s ability to quickly understand the facts in a matter. For more insights into your organization’s data landscape, Download the Ipro Pre-Litigation Data Inventory Checklist now!

Ipro Pre-Litigation Data Checklist