Category Archives: Featured

Redaction Errors in Federal Opioid Case Reveal Importance of Legal Technology

legal redaction technology

Redaction Errors in Federal Opioid Case Reveal Importance of Legal Technology

For as long as humans have been writing things down, redactions have been a part of the process. In the beginning, they were used to integrate disparate stories and folktales, but these days, when we hear about redactions, it’s usually in regard to investigations and legal actions.

For the public—especially those who are hungry for conspiracy theories and secrets—redactions are a tantalizing hint at what’s not being said; however, for those in the legal industry, redactions are a part of everyday life. But this doesn’t mean they’re mundane! On the contrary, failure to redact documents or to make sure that redacted content is produced in its redacted format can be case ending (and job ending for the person responsible for the error).

The most common reason this happens, is because law firms are taking the “redact by hand” route instead of using tools that properly manage productions to ensure documents meet the expected production requirements (i.e. making sure the information meant to be kept private is hidden). By not using redaction technology, law firms are flirting with disaster.

Which is exactly where law firm Jones Day found itself last week after exposing secret grand jury information in a court filing as a result of using Microsoft Word and Adobe Acrobat, instead of specialized redaction technology, which Jones Day partner, James Wooley said, “is specifically designed to avoid such issues. The failure to use this software was inadvertent oversight.”

At first glance, the filing appeared redacted, but a member of the press was able to defeat the redaction by simply copying the black-out boxes and pasting the text into a new document.

Ryan Joyce, VP of Strategy at Ipro, commented, “Time and time again we have seen the same headline—a law firm or government agency getting in trouble for not handling their redactions correctly. Why is this still an issue after all these years? Any software can draw a colored box over text, but only the right software will produce it correctly.”

But even when redactions are properly handled, a newly published study by the University of Zurich may make them a moot point. By using a combination of AI and over 120,000 legal records, researchers “were able to identify the participants in confidential legal cases, even though such participants had been anonymized.” And if that doesn’t give pause, they did so with an 84% accuracy rate after mining data for only one hour.

Still, even if anonymized information in legal documents can be defeated—by robots or gross oversight—the requirement to redact documents correctly isn’t going away anytime soon. Which means law firms should ensure they have the technology in place to properly handle redactions, along with the processes in place to ensure that technology is used. If they don’t, it could mean sanctions for the firm and unemployment for the individual who made the error.

How Ipro Can Help with Redactions

Tools like Ipro’s Production Shield (which is included in the enterprise and desktop eDiscovery solutions by Ipro) allow administrators to add another layer of protection for documents that should not be produced. When using Production Shield, such documents are identified during the validation phase of the export process, giving administrators the opportunity to correct conflicts and ensure only appropriate documents are produced.

In addition to Production Shield, Ipro ensures accurate redactions by:

  • Automatically re-OCRing the document to remove any text under the redaction
  • Running validations to ensure redactions are burned in and the text is correct
  • Creating layered redactions, so multiple production sets can be sent to multiple parties
  • Having 30 years’ experience in the legaltech industry – we know our redactions!

 Find Out More About How Ipro Can Ensure Accurate Productions for your Firm!

 

Written by Jim Gill
Content Writer, Ipro

Ipro Announces Major Performance and Productivity Gains to its Best-In-Class Processing Engine, eCapture

eCapture by Ipro

Over the last four years, Ipro has been updating its industry-leading processing capabilities based on the foundation of eCapture. It is the backbone processing engine of the Ipro for enterprise solution. Ipro’s new streaming technology has automated the entire eDiscovery process from the upload of data through Production into ECA or Review. Integrating with Ipro for enterprise’s self-service module allows custodians to upload documents without needing direct access to the controller or job queue. The automation allows customers to kick off a job and leave the office knowing that the case is rapidly moving forward.

The quality and the amount of processing options to handle complex data types truly sets eCapture apart from all other competition. This includes the QC Module, which is a feature-rich quality control module allowing customers to filter and find flagged documents, validate processed data, and easily correct issues.

While already hailed as best-in-class by industry analysts and users for its ability to take control over large, complex data sets with outstanding speed and unparalleled quality, Ipro continues to innovate and dramatically improve eCapture, creating major performance and productivity gains in the software, including:

  • Unlimited extraction of meta-data fields
  • Increases in overall processing speed, up to 40%
  • Report generation speed performance gains of up to 95% on SSDs
  • Up to 70% efficiencies in CPU usage
  • Improved processing of new and complex file types
  • Superior image and production quality, including the latest MS Office file types

In addition, several improvements were made in the latest version of eCapture (2019.6.2) including 1) the ability to auto-publish all documents to review, even those held back due to errors, 2) extracting additional metadata from photographs and PDF files, 3) the ability to convert standard discovery to streaming discovery jobs to take advantage of the speed and more efficient workflow, 4) improved handling of documents with passwords, while driving down installation and upgrade times, making it possible to move to the latest version with minimal interruptions to business and down-time.

Finally, eCapture, the engine of Ipro for enterprise, has a robust roadmap, including work with our partners to continue developing secure public API’s—allowing partners full access to customize their workflows and take advantage of the power of eCapture.

Visit us here to learn more about eCapture by Ipro or Ipro for enterprise

 

About Ipro Tech, LLC

Ipro is a global leader in eDiscovery technology used by legal professionals to streamline discovery of electronic data through presentation at trial. Ipro draws upon decades of innovation to deliver high-performance software, services, and support, bundled as a solution and deployed the way you want it—Desktop, On-prem or Cloud—significantly reducing the cost and complexity of eDiscovery.

Lawyerist Podcast #241 with Derek Miller

Ipro’s next sponsored podcast on The Lawyerist! In this episode, Derek Miller, Ipro’s VP of Desktop Solutions, talks about the importance of having fact management.

Using Ipro for desktop’s fact management tool can:

  • Organize information into workbooks for fast recall
  • Easily identify the most important facts
  • Tell a compelling story through chronologically ordered evidence

Listen now and also learn from Stephanie Everett, as she talks about their new book, The Small Firm Roadmap and why they wrote it. This podcast outlines major points from the book including why law practice is broken and how we can create successful, future-oriented small and solo law firms. 

Learn more and request a demo for our all new Ipro for desktop here.

The Forgotten Middle Child of the EDRM: eDiscovery Processing Challenges and How Technology Can Help

eDiscovery Processing

eDiscovery Processing Challenges and How Technology Can Help

The processing stage of eDiscovery is like the forgotten middle child of the EDRM. Most people working in eDiscovery are focused on how to best preserve and collect data, and then how to find what’s relevant from that collection during review. The processing stage – which falls between those steps – is usually just expected to happen. Like magic. But processing isn’t magic. It’s an important and challenging step in the eDiscovery process that many people may overlook.

Challenges from a Developer’s Point of View

Scott Kirk, Product Manager of Processing at Ipro, said that one of the biggest challenges when it comes to developing software for this stage is the, “near infinite file types and variations within each type.”

This isn’t something that’s hard to grasp when you think about it. Just look at all the programs and applications you may use in a given day: email, chat, social media, planning and content-creation tools, etc. All of these create different file types. Different versions of the same program or application create variations, and different formatting within each of those can create still more variations. So even something as common as a word or an excel file may seem straightforward, there are so many variables that have to be considered (reverse engineering, deconstructing them, gathering the metadata, text, etc.) when getting those collected files into review.

While adapting to new file types is important, Kirk also raises the issue of knowing “how soon to support a new ‘fad’ file-type? Is the work worth it, is the type prevalent enough to warrant the effort, time, and money to support it if one customer comes across an unusual file type once a year?”

Challenges from the User’s Point of View

Tom O’Connor, director of the Gulf Coast Legal Technology Center and well-known industry thought-leader notes three main challenges when it comes to the processing stage:

Loading Data: “Load file prep is still a mess. I (and people I work with) still get up to two-thirds of their load files with errors.”

Separate Programs: “Being able to load data into the program which will also do the review is a major help, instead of having one program for processing then moving it into a separate review program.”

Exception Reporting: “This is absolutely crucial, and it’s astonishing to me how many programs don’t do it or do it in an incomplete manner.”

Steps for Creating a Smooth Processing Stage

Know Your Data

As with most things in eDiscovery, knowing your organization’s data landscape is a good first step. Find out what programs are being used for communication and data creation and include them in a data inventory. That way if litigation should arise, you will have a heads-up for particular file-types that may be easy enough to preserve but might cause issues during processing (such as Slack or other new data types).

Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late to Start Researching

If you’re a corporation, don’t wait until litigation is imminent to begin researching potential eDiscovery software and service providers. Know the different options which are available to your organization and which would fit your individual needs.

If you’re a law firm, it’s easy to get stuck in a “that’s the way we’ve always done it” mentality. Be on the lookout for trends in new file types that organizations are using, as well as ways to streamline the speed and outcome of data processing. You can also look for a powerful processing engine that built into an advanced Review tool. The goal is to get to the facts of the case as quickly as possible. Which means that processing shouldn’t get in the way of moving collected data into ECA and Review so that relevant data can be identified.

If you’re a service provider, you’ll also want to research if a processing engine can operate by itself or if it’s part of a larger suite of eDiscovery tools, along with any connectors available that would allow you to hook into other applications your clients may need.

Look for a Technology Partner

Fortunately, you don’t have to do all of this alone. After understanding your data and what your processing needs might be, look for a vendor that will partner with you, not only with their software, but also with the ability to provide services and support on demand, so that any situation that may arise can be handled quickly, accurately, and efficiently.

How Ipro Can Help

eCapture is the backbone processing engine of Ipro for enterprise, and can take control over large, complex data sets with outstanding speed, while producing the highest quality documents for review. eCapture’s automated workers require almost no human supervision, allowing it to continue processing data, even after hours.

File Types

Ipro for enterprise can process hundreds of different electronic file types, including complex situations such as extracting comments from PDFs or pulling additional metadata from photographs. You can also feed passwords into eCapture at the start, allowing password-protected data across jobs (Discovery, Streaming Discovery, Data Extract, Process, and Enterprise Imaging) to be unwrapped as they’re processed, including extraction from protected PST files. Then, when the job is complete, you can convert the final document collection to TIFF or PDF using high-speed production technology, saving time and money by streamlining your discovery workflow.

Load File Errors

The most recent reporting from Ipro shows that eCapture has an error rate well below industry standards (13.9% on ingestion and 6.3% on processing). Combine this with the Ipro Support Team’s 95.4% Satisfaction Rating, a Net Promoter Score of 78, and 30 years’ experience in the industry, and you know your data is in good hands.

QC Reporting

Ipro for enterprise has a feature-rich quality control module which lets QC personnel validate processed data in batches appropriate for their skill level. Ipro for enterprise will also flag certain documents for further attention during QC.

Streams into Review

eCapture by Ipro is fully functional as a standalone application, but also works as the processing engine for Ipro’s enterprise solution. With Ipro for enterprise, processed data is streamed directly into review where multiple advanced analytics tools (including ECA and TAR) are available, giving reviewers eyes on documents in minutes.

Find Out How Your Organization Can Get 15x Faster Processing with Ipro!

 

Written by Jim Gill
Content Writer, Ipro

Why are Managed Services on the Rise in eDiscovery? 4 Scenarios to Shed Some Light on the Matter

eDiscovery managed services

Why are Managed Services on the Rise in eDiscovery? 4 Scenarios to Shed Some Light on the Matter

A few years ago (and maybe still) a lot of people in legaltech spoke of the idea of a single legal team doing everything in-house – end to end – with the help of technology. And this is definitely possible. But only a tiny percentage are able to do this. Because let’s face it – even with the latest technology, eDiscovery is a complicated endeavor, and it would take a very mature legal team, including an eDiscovery-savvy IT department to handle every situation. That’s why managed services are on the rise, with law firms and corporations utilizing them as part of their eDiscovery process.

In a recent article on his blog eDiscovery Strategy, Chuck Kellner laid out a really great overview of some of the reasons why this is happening.

To expand on that, here are some (but certainly not all) situations where eDiscovery services could come into play.

  1. eDiscovery On-Demand

Many law firms (particularly smaller or boutique firms) don’t want to invest in eDiscovery software, infrastructure, or personnel, but it doesn’t mean they aren’t having to deal with Electronically Stored Information (ESI). If the document count stays relatively low, they can usually find a work-around using manual processes (which has its own problems). But when something comes in like an Intellectual Property suit involving a large quantity of documents, manual processes or even legacy technology doesn’t cut it when you have a short turnaround time required to process, review, and produce the ESI needed to deliver a favorable result in the case.

This is where managed services come in. You’re assigned a dedicated case manager who can assist with strategy and planning on how to execute everything including the initial data collection, processing, review, and production. They can reduce your document universe headed to review (which is the largest area of cost in eDiscovery) by leveraging ECA and advanced analytics. They can even help you set up proven review workflows to help your team get the facts as quickly as possible. And after the matter is concluded, the law firm now has a relationship with this case manager, who already understands their firm’s unique needs should another case arise where they need help.

  1. Complex and Specialty Discovery

Just because a firm has eDiscovery processes and technology in place, doesn’t mean they’re prepared to handle every scenario. Custom and complex discovery requests are one example. Let’s say a law firm had a request from an attorney that would only review documents in consolidated PDFs. The attorney provided 4 PSTs, one for each custodian, and in return wanted all emails and their attachments in a single pdf, and all documents within a PST placed in a single pdf portfolio. The final deliverable is essentially 4 giant PDFs. Some may label this an overly complex request and reject it. But a managed services team that specializes in these things can leverage their processing engine to convert PSTs into single files and repackage them into single layered PDFs.

  1. Corporate Legal Teams

As I said before, it takes a mature legal team to deal with complex eDiscovery, particularly when you have large datasets and start moving to the right-side of the EDRM (processing, review, and production). Corporate teams often deal with legal holds, data preservation and collection, but will call in an assist from managed services for help after that.

One thing that is of value to corporate teams when it comes to managed services is having a dedicated eDiscovery Project Manager to assist with building a workflow that is comprehensive and cost-effective. When it comes to processing your collected ESI, most in-house corporate teams don’t have an automated and scalable solution. Today, datasets can become unwieldy and with the ever-growing number of filetypes, things can get tricky. Managed Services can quickly and accurately get things moved into Early Case Assessment (ECA), so that data can be culled and streamlined and only the most relevant documents are sent to review. And then there are production deadlines. Services teams can build production templates ahead of time, image relevant documents proactively as they become available, and do a thorough QC of the production to ensure the job is done right and on time.

Besides all of these things, corporations who may regularly face litigation can reuse ESI processing, review, and production histories. They simply pay a flat fee to host the data and can use it again without having to go through (and pay for) the process should it become relevant in another case.

  1. Predictable Pricing

This aspect of managed services applies to both law firms and corporate legal teams. The cost of eDiscovery, particularly the review stage, can be both expensive and hard to predict. Managed services often are billed based on the amount of data rather than an hourly basis, which provides much more insight into costs at the beginning rather than having to wait until the job is completed. This allows you to process your data, weed out irrelevant ESI, and get a look at the facts of your case before review, while only paying for data processed. If you decide to keep this data hosted for future use or reference, then a flat-fee for hosting applies, which is a much more cost-effective approach than sending your entire collection through review and having to pick your jaw up off the floor when you get the bill.

Conclusion:

There are many other scenarios that may come into play when it comes to applying managed services to eDiscovery, but it’s clear why legal teams use them. Technology alone can make a difference, but having the support, expertise, and experience of a technology partner can allow you to handle cases of any size and complexity without the stress of having to do everything on your own.

 

Find Out How Ipro’s Services Team Can Help You with Your Next eDiscovery Dilemma!

 

Written by Jim Gill
Ipro Content Writer

How 3 Cases Involving Self-Driving Cars Highlight eDiscovery and the IoT

Self-driving cars, eDiscovery, IoT

How 3 Cases Involving Self-Driving Cars Highlight eDiscovery and the IoT

Litigation is nothing new for the auto industry. But recent lawsuits surrounding accidents involving self-driving vehicles show that Electronically Stored Information (ESI) is a key component in these cases, because modern cars collect enormous amounts of data, which can be used to determine the fault of accidents, whether it’s human or machine driver error, or some other design flaw in the automobile itself.

Self-driving cars continue to become a regular part of daily life. But like any new technology, flaws and user-errors become more apparent as they’re taken from the test bed to the real world. While we’re still years away from truly autonomous vehicles ruling the roads, the question that continues to come up with driver-assisted technologies is whether they protect us against human error, or if human reliance on technology makes drivers less competent.

The following cases show how self-driving cars (and the data they collect) will continue to highlight the role eDiscovery plays when it comes to the Internet of Things and all the new data sources that everyday devices create.

The Self-Driving Uber:

In March of 2018, pedestrian Elaine Herzberg was killed by one of Uber’s self-driving cars as she crossed a multi-lane road in Tempe, Arizona. The investigation included data from the car as well as dashcam video. While it was determined that the automatic braking system was turned off to avoid erratic driving conditions, the human driver, Rafael Vazquez, was found at fault for the death. Dashcam video showed Vasquez repeatedly looking down at her lap in the final minutes before the crash, including the five seconds before impact. Additional ESI provided from the driver’s Hulu account, shows that Vazquez was streaming the television show The Voice just before the crash. If the driver had been paying attention, the car’s data showed that the accident most likely could have been avoided.

Tesla on Autopilot:

In March 2019, Jeremy Banner’s Tesla Model 3 collided with a tractor-trailer that was crossing his path on a Florida highway. An investigation is currently underway, as his family is suing Tesla for wrongful death. A preliminary report from the National Transportation Safety Board revealed Banner turned on autopilot just before the crash, and the vehicle “did not detect the driver’s hands on the steering wheel.”

This incident is similar to a 2016 accident which killed 40-year-old Joshua Brown when a tractor-trailer crossed his path while he was using autopilot. Tesla said in that investigation that its camera system failed to recognize the white broadside of the truck against the bright sky. However, it was also found that Brown was not paying attention to the road, though the NTSB said a lack of safeguards contributed to his death.

Tesla and the 2-year-old Driver:

In this incident, Mallory Harcourt of Santa Barbara, claims that in December 2018, while unloading groceries from her Tesla Model X parked in the driveway, her two-year-old son jumped in the driver’s seat, and the car unexpectedly lurched forward, ultimately pinning her to the garage wall. Harcourt, who was pregnant, suffered a broken leg and pelvis, and went into labor, which led to the premature delivery of her daughter.

The plaintiff and defendant are in agreement that the vehicle was shifted from Park into Drive. Because the Model X (and older Model S) don’t have a driving-facing camera like the Model 3, Tesla can’t confirm how this happened. But the car’s data does confirm that “the brake pedal was released shortly after the vehicle was put into Drive, and the accelerator pressed for the following seven seconds, interrupted briefly by application of the brake pedal.” The impact occurred with the left rear door still open and prior to an application of the brake pedal heavy enough to activate the anti-lock brakes.

There have been other lawsuits against Tesla for “unintended acceleration” but none have been won.

Conclusion:

What is clear from each of these cases is how vital the role of ESI collected from vehicles and periphery devices is when determining cause and liability. In these cases, the combination of video, car data (indicating things as detailed as how long acceleration and brakes were applied, whether someone was in the driver’s seat or their hands were on the wheel, whether a door was open, and when impact occurred), and ESI from other devices such as a tablet or a driver’s Hulu account, were all part of the investigations. As the Internet of Things continues to grow, items that were once merely mechanical devices – phones, cars, refrigerators, etc. – are now repositories of electronic evidence. And should litigation arise, the data they contain must be made discoverable.

These scenarios involving self-driving cars may not fall under the day-to-day operations of most law firms, but they do highlight new examples of how electronic data is collected during litigation (which is eDiscovery). In the same way that email data was still a novel source of evidence 15 years ago or social media data was the new ESI 5 years ago, IoT data will continue to be requested, and legal teams will have to respond.

 

Written by Jim Gill
Ipro Content Writer

 

Learn more about how Ipro’s hybrid approach to eDiscovery can help your organization meet any challenge.

6 Reasons Why Desktop eDiscovery is a Viable Solution in a Cloud-Based World

desktop eDiscovery is a viable solution

6 Reasons Why Desktop eDiscovery is Still a Viable Solution in a Cloud-Based World

For several years now, cloud-based eDiscovery has been touted as the wave of the future, and there’s no doubt about its benefits.

  • Scalability

In the cloud large datasets aren’t a problem, giving you the ability to scale when big cases arrive at your door

  • No Maintenance Required

Because the cloud host manages software and infrastructure updates, you never have to worry about upgrades

  • Predictable Pricing

Cloud-based platforms are often priced on a subscription model, giving the user predictability when it comes to budgeting

But for all the power the cloud brings, sometimes it’s not always the answer to an organization’s needs before or after review. That’s where a modern (not legacy products from the last decade), easy-to-deploy, local solution can cut a lot of hours and pain from your daily workload, while keeping overhead even lower than a cloud-hosted enterprise solution.

Here are 6 reasons desktop eDiscovery is still a viable solution:

Low Cost Quick Look

Need to take a quick look at a PST, some loose files, or a few directories of data? If you FTP your data to the cloud, it adds to your hosting costs. A solution like Ipro for desktop allows you to quickly ingest any native data, perform ECA and quick Review, find what you want, and produce it. If data needs to be hosted after that, you’ll only be paying for what’s relevant.

After the Case is Done

After a case, you need to maintain the data, allowing you to go back and retrieve and produce documents when asked. But do you really need to leave that data in the cloud where monthly hosting fees continue to add up? Ipro for desktop allows you to archive your hosted cases locally with the full power to access everything at any time, with virtually no cost.

Fact Management and Case Prep

You won’t find this in enterprise cloud eDiscovery platforms! But with Ipro for desktop, data streams from Review into the fact manager, allowing you to organize evidence at any phase of the litigation life-cycle. Rather than just tagging a document for later, users can cite the specific text or section of a document, link it to the “fact” and call it up during presentation. You can also share and search transcripts between modules, making your case-build efficient and simplified.

No Internet? No problem!

Even with today’s technology, you may still find yourself without internet, whether in the courtroom, on a plane over the ocean, or when service may just not be what you need. With Ipro’s desktop eDiscovery solution, you can go completely mobile with a “Published” version of your case that runs in the review database on your local machine. Once you have service again, you can sync all of your changes and work-product back to the network.

Other tasks that may be difficult for cloud platforms but not for Ipro for desktop

  • Scan directly into a database
  • Print from a print server to offload the individual Review user machines
  • Easy bulk Unitization of large documents
  • Easy bulk image and OCR of documents
  • Ingest raw images without a loadfile
  • Clip and crop 3rd party production images and re-brand
  • Manual coding with names normalization
  • Custom production options, and many more…

Scale to the Cloud When Things Get Big

Yes, a desktop solution can surge to the cloud if the need arises. If your cases get too large for your physical infrastructure or need to be accessed online by co-counsel, they can temporarily be moved to the Ipro cloud, giving you that extra horsepower on demand, allowing you to take on cases of any size or complexity without significant ramp-up time or monetary investment.

Conclusion:

Again, the cloud has many benefits, but there are some things only a desktop solution can do. And if it’s been purpose-built for modern challenges, there’s no reason why desktop shouldn’t have a place at the eDiscovery table.

To learn more about Ipro’s Desktop eDiscovery solution, visit us here.

5 Ways Paralegals Can Quickly Sharpen their eDiscovery Skills

eDiscovery Paralegals

5 Ways Paralegals Can Quickly Sharpen their eDiscovery Skills

Paralegals have long been a part of law offices and legal teams, fulfilling roles like conducting research, client interviews, drafting documents, and handling other administrative tasks. But more and more, paralegals find themselves charged with handling all things related to eDiscovery as well.

Attorneys are interested in getting to the facts of a case so they can build a strategy. But obtaining and organizing that data falls to litigation support personnel, many of whom are paralegals. When working with electronic data, a paralegal’s role becomes part case project manager and part IT liaison. Some of the things expected of an eDiscovery paralegal may include:

  • Acting as Case Manager by organizing a database for all Electronically Stored Information (ESI)
  • Managing the collection process with a client and talking with their IT to figure out the best way to obtain the needed ESI
  • Once the ESI has been obtained, resolving any issues with the data, such as corrupted files or missing metadata
  • Creating search templates using the search terms and parameters set forth by the parties in the case
  • Redacting privileged data
  • Conducting Quality Control on production sets to ensure the discovery parameters were met

Becoming an eDiscovery specialist can really set you apart from other paralegals and lead you to expanded career opportunities, but eDiscovery carries a unique set of challenges that often isn’t a traditional part of a paralegal’s training.

Kelly Twigger, Attorney and eDiscovery thought leader, stated in a past Above the Law article, that “lawyers [assume] that picking up the complexities of ESI and handling data is something their paralegals can just do. I’m here to tell you that it’s not.” She continues, “If you are expecting your paralegal to have the skill set necessary to manage ESI, including setting up and managing your databases, without some serious training, you are putting yourself and your clients at risk.”

Training is definitely one thing paralegals can do to up their eDiscovery game. As Jared Coseglia, CEO of TRU Staffing said in an article published by LegalTech news, “the plug-and-play technical accountability of an eDiscovery professional is largely measured by the software certification status that individual achieves and maintains.” But certification isn’t often the first step. To pass industry certifications, you have to have more than a basic knowledge of eDiscovery. In the same LegalTech News article, Krista Schmidt, manager of professional services at Ipro said, “A person needs to be well-rounded and understand many things to pass the certifications. You can’t just know review or processing.”

So what can you do to get started? Here are 5 ways paralegals can sharpen their eDiscovery skills!

Fully understand the case

A lot of things paralegals need are in the case materials themselves. There you can identify key custodians and sources of ESI for collection, search terms, and privilege determinations. You’ll also need to become familiar with contacts in your client’s organization (like the client’s IT department) to best figure out how to collect the data requested in discovery.

Find out what software is available at your organization

Sometimes, attorneys might not be aware of the tools available for managing eDiscovery. Once you know what software options your organization has, you can find out if there are any internal resources, perhaps located on an intranet. There may even be others within the organization who have gained training and/or certification on the software to provide guidance.

Google it!

It sounds obvious, but there is actually a lot of great information on the web from other practitioners and thought leaders. Articles, white-papers, infographics, even YouTube videos may be available from reputable sources to help paralegals come up to speed on processes and tactics that can help make your life in eDiscovery a little easier.

Check with your eDiscovery Software Vendor

If you own your eDiscovery software, the vendor most likely has a resources center available for users. They may have tutorials or even a help desk where you could get expert advice on common eDiscovery challenges or how to create the best workflow for the case at hand.

Training and Certification

Finally, if you want to build your career in eDiscovery, getting training and certification is an excellent way to show your expertise. Most software vendors offer a certification for their products. It may even be worthwhile to attain training on multiple software offerings, if your team uses more than one vendor. There are also general eDiscovery certifications (the Certified eDiscovery Specialist (CEDS) is one of the most common).

To find out more about Ipro’s training and certifications, visit us here

Ipro Showcases Latest Innovations at ILTACON

Ipro Showcases Innovations at ILTACON

Ipro Showcases Latest Innovations at ILTACON

This week, Ipro will be showcasing their latest innovations and product offerings at ILTACON, the premier legal technology conference for professionals undertaking initiatives in support of the practice of law.

Ipro will be in booth 304 at ILTACON, August 18-22. There you will be able to see:

Ipro for desktop

You’ll get to check out the latest innovations in Ipro for desktop, formerly Eclipse SE, including high-speed ingestion with advanced settings & integration with TrialDirector 360 featuring a new interface and enhancements.

Ipro for desktop runs in a dynamic dashboard that launches different modules in a stack and seamlessly flows data through the different phases of litigation: case management, administration, processing, review, fact management, and trial presentation with TrialDirector 360®. With this true all-in-one litigation platform, you can effortlessly manage reviews, unitize documents, ingest native files, and produce documents.

Ipro for enterprise

Learn more about the NEW Ipro for Enterprise, formerly Eclipse & Automated Digital Discovery (ADD).

Ipro for enterprise is an eDiscovery workflow solution that allows users to easily process any type of data, have it ready for analysis or review in minutes, and avoid lengthy upload times for situations needing an agile response. Ipro for enterprise bundles Ipro’s gold-standard in Imaging, OCR, Processing and Production, with the latest innovations in Review – including advanced analytics, Technology Assisted Review, and ECA – all into an easy-to-use intuitive interface.

Hybrid eDiscovery with the Ipro Cloud

Regardless of the software deployment you’re using (desktop, on-prem, or cloud hosted), you can scale up using the Ipro Cloud at any time. The Ipro Cloud gives you the scalability of a public cloud with the data control of a private cloud, with a hosting team that speaks the same language as your legal team and acts as your dedicated eDiscovery IT department. Our state-of-the-art data center has a limited employee access to sensitive data & a lower profile for targeted hacks. And hosting fees are a fraction of those on public clouds.

Want a deeper dive into the software? Book a private meeting at the show!
No badge needed.

It’s Trial Season and Presentation is Everything

Trial Presentation Software

We all know the difference visuals can make in a presentation. We’ve sat in audiences and struggled connecting with a speaker, because their slides were strings of black bullet points and good old Times New Roman. Their content and expertise may have been world class, but their slide deck might as well have been a pocket watch dangled from a hypnotist’s hand, his voice whispering Sleep, sleep in our ears.

When you’re an attorney preparing for trial, that’s the last thing you want to happen when you present your case. Trial presentation software (like TrialDirector 360 by Ipro) definitely makes a difference. Gone are the days of fumbling with an ELMO or shuffling through binders with thousands of pages to prove your case. TrialDirector allows you to bring in your pre-trial exhibits, pretreat documents, and organize them into workbooks. You can even create and edit video depositions when a witness is unable to attend trial. And even if you don’t go to trial, TrialDirector can still be used for hearings and arbitrations.

Trial Services

This all sounds great. The problem is, you went to law school instead of studying graphic design. Sure, having TrialDirector would help, but if you’re not an expert at using it, you may as well go back to your flip chart. That’s where Ipro Trial Services comes in and saves the day.

We have the largest number of certified Trial Consultants in the industry and bring years of experience in the courtroom to your litigation team. With our assistance, your team can focus on case theory, strategy, and the law, rather than how, where, and when the exhibits will be displayed in court.

There are many additional advantages to having lpro trial consultants with you in the courtroom. lpro’s on-site trial team can “free-up” your litigation staff, while the consultants work with the trial attorneys to pre­pare a witness, create demonstrative graphics, and provide document imaging and management services. Additionally, our trial consultants will maintain presentation and war room system integrity throughout the trial.

And our graphic designers know what demonstrative types work for each situation in the courtroom. This experience allows them to collaborate alongside experts and team members, recommending and creating stunning visuals that drive home the principle themes in your case.

We’ll even come to the courtroom with you! Every one of our trial consultants is required to master TrialDirector360 and other cutting-edge technology, to maximize the impact of your presentation, so you can focus on presenting the facts to the jury.

Find out more about how Ipro can help you make an impact during trial!