Category Archives: Industry News

3 Challenges Corporate Legal Teams Face With BYOD

corporate legal BYOD

 

3 Challenges Corporate Legal Teams Face With BYOD

JD Supra Readers Choice Top Author 2020Written by Jim Gill
Content Chief, Ipro

Today’s eDiscovery Blues comic highlights several challenges In-House legal teams might face when working with data in the face of litigation, starting with the sinking feeling that comes when you ask yourself, “Is the I.T. department being sarcastic?” That’s part of the humor here, but the answer given about simply having everyone use Snapchat as a solution for employees using their personal mobile devices for work (Bring Your Own Device or BYOD) raises several points worth discussing.

Corporate Legal Challenge #1: Mobile Devices, eDiscovery & BYOD

Mobile devices can be difficult when it comes to eDiscovery for many reasons. They contain a large variety of file-types and data intermingled with a lot of private information, which may be privileged. Extracting specific information can be difficult and imaging an entire device can be costly (read this example from recent case law for more on the pros and cons of imaging entire mobile devices).

That’s why it’s important to have policies in place to determine how mobile devices are used for business purposes, which is exactly what Rick Compliance, eDiscovery manager, was trying to do when he called I.T. above.

Corporate Legal Challenge #2: Social Media / Chat, eDiscovery & BYOD

Messaging platforms (e.g. Slack, Teams, What’s App) and social media (e.g. Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Snapchat) go hand in hand with mobile devices, and we all know that business is conducted across multiple platforms and devices, sometimes simultaneously. Gaining insight into the ESI created by these can be difficult.

With social media, data can usually be requested from the source company (For example, Instagram has a data request form in its Privacy and Security settings), and chat files can be exported, but both of these can be difficult to put into a review-ready format, losing the context of the conversations held within them. And these new data sources continue to grow and be used in interesting ways, as this recent case shows: Etsy Post Leads to Arrest of Cop Car Arson Suspect in Philly.

Knowing if these platforms are a potential source of data for your organization should litigation arise is vital. Having policies in place around their use for business and alignment between Legal and I.T. should this data need to be collected is ideal.

Corporate Legal Challenge #3: Avoiding Sanctions for Mobile Data Spoliation, Including Ephemeral Data

Finally, the notion of a company telling employees to use ephemeral data messaging as part of their BYOD policy isn’t so far-fetched. And it can lead to sanctions.

In a recent case, WeRide Corp. v. Huang et al. (N.D. Cal. Apr. 24, 2020), the defendants were sanctioned under FRCP Rule 37, because they directed employees of their company AllRide to communicate using the application DingTalk internally. The CEO testified, he felt it was “more secure” than other messaging platforms; however, DingTalk allows for “ephemeral messages” that automatically delete after they have been sent and read (much the same as Snapchat, mentioned in the cartoon above).

The court’s ruling stated, “AllRide left in place the autodelete setting on its email server, began using DingTalk’s ephemeral messaging feature, and maintained a policy of deleting the email accounts and wiping the computers of former employees after the preliminary injunction issued. This practice of destroying potentially discoverable material shows both willfulness and bad faith. Based on these undisputed facts, the Court finds it appropriate to issue terminating sanctions.”

Conclusion

Mobile Data is no joke and having alignment between Legal, IT, Compliance and other stakeholders is a must before litigation arises. Without clear policies in place, there are so many ways mobile data can quickly become a problem.

For more insights into your organization’s data landscape, Download the Ipro Pre-Litigation Data Inventory Checklist now!

Ipro Pre-Litigation Data Checklist

4 Reasons Why Summer is the Right Time to Start the Ipro Virtual Administrator Training Series

Ipro Virtual Administrator Training

4 Reasons Why Summer is the Right Time to Start the Ipro Virtual Administrator Training Series
Written by Julie Badger, Product Learning Experience Manager, Ipro

While it may be summer, the time for learning doesn’t stop, and we here at Ipro are focusing our energy on helping our customers get the most out of their Ipro products with Ipro training courses.

The Ipro training team has built a solid body of training materials and courses targeted to meet the needs of adult learners where they are. You might wonder, “What’s so different about adult learners?” Well, research shows that adult learners learn differently, have different motivations, and different educational needs which must be addressed:

  • Adult learners draw on their past experiences to inform their current learning objectives.
  • Adult learners are goal oriented, targeted learners who narrow their learning objectives to only what is most relevant and applicable.
  • Adult learners are also very self-directed and learn more by practicing and doing than by rote memorization.

With adult-learning theory in mind, we’ve adapted our former in-house training courses and made them available in in virtual web-series format. The beauty of this adapted course curriculum is that it gives the learner the ability to grasp the concepts by following along during the lecture-based training. Then, separately, learners can go work on the practice exercises and homework to deepen their understanding of the materials in the context of their own software implementation. The combination of lecture-based learning with self-guided learning can really help cement the core concepts in a learner’s brain.

At Ipro we’re committed to educational excellence and would love to help you meet your education goals in 2020.

If you book an open session for the Ipro Virtual Administrator Training Series
any time between June 1st and July 31styou can receive a 20% discount on the course fee:
Use the promo code SUMMER20 when you sign up. 

Click Here for More Information — We hope you’ll join us!

Time to Update Your eDiscovery SWOT Analysis! (If You Even Have One)

eDiscovery SWOT Analysis

Time to Update Your eDiscovery SWOT Analysis! (If You Even Have One)
Written by Doug Austin, Editor of eDiscovery Today

Periodically, it’s a good idea to reassess your SWOT analysis and update as appropriate to address changing environmental opportunities and threats.  And with the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on so many businesses, there has never been a better time to consider updating your SWOT analysis – or creating one in the first place if you didn’t already have one.

What is a SWOT Analysis?

What the heck is a “SWOT” analysis? It’s a structured planning method used to evaluate the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats associated with a specific business objective. That business objective can be a specific project or all of the activities of a business unit (e.g., your discovery practice). And it involves not only identifying that specific business objective but also identifying the internal and external factors that are favorable and unfavorable to achieving that objective.

The SWOT analysis breaks down as follows:

  • Strengths: Characteristics of the business or project that give it an advantage over others, such as activities your business unit does well, skills of your internal resources, etc.
  • Weaknesses: Characteristics that place the team at a disadvantage relative to others, such as attributes that you don’t have (but your competitors do), resource limitations, etc.
  • Opportunities: Elements in the environment that the project could exploit to its advantage, such as emerging need for your products or services, lack of competition, etc.
  • Threats: Elements in the environment that could cause trouble for the business or project, such as emerging competitors, change in economic conditions, etc.

Strengths and opportunities are helpful to your business unit; weakness and threats are harmful to it. Strengths and weaknesses are internal in origin and are attributes of your business unit, while opportunities and threats are external in original and are attributes of the environment that affects your business unit – many of your strengths or weaknesses may in fact be in response to those opportunities and threats.

Defining your “competitors” depends on what your business unit is designed to do. If you’re a litigation unit (in a corporation and/or law firm), your competitors could be the other side in a specific case. If you’re an eDiscovery provider, your competitors could be other providers with which you’re competing for business.

How to Conduct a SWOT Analysis:

To conduct a SWOT analysis, create a 2 x 2 matrix with the strengths and weaknesses on one row and the opportunities and threats on the following row.  You can easily create one using Excel or Word tables. Here is an example of what an empty SWOT analysis can look like, courtesy of Wikipedia.  Once you have constructed an empty SWOT analysis, you then proceed to list your business unit’s strengths and weaknesses and the opportunities and threats affecting your business unit in the respective boxes.  The exercise can help you make decisions about areas for your business unit to address to maximize its success.

Example eDiscovery SWOT Analysis:

While there are certainly threats during this challenging time, there are also opportunities that can impact your business as well, if you’re prepared to take advantage of them. Let’s take a look at a few of both:

Opportunities:

  • While this would be considered a “threat” for non-litigation related businesses, there is expected to be a large swell of litigation cases filed related to the pandemic and associated economic challenges derived from it that could lead to additional business for litigation and eDiscovery providers.
  • Layoffs at many eDiscovery providers and law firms have led to a huge available talent pool of qualified talent in eDiscovery. There has never been a better time to add talented and experienced staff to move your company forward.
  • The move toward remote work has opened up the talent pool available to fill open positions. Geographical location/willingness to relocate has been effectively limited as a position requirement for many positions, causing the list of potential qualified candidates to expand considerably.

Threats:

  • Court closures have slowed case dockets, which have (in turn) reduced requests for eDiscovery services, at least in some cases in the short term.
  • Business uncertainty has led to fewer requests for eDiscovery services, extended payment cycles for services and software or even potential defaults on payments for companies going bankrupt.
  • Lack of in-person interaction with clients and prospects in meetings and at conferences have affected the ability for eDiscovery providers to attract new customers or retain existing ones.

Sometimes, a factor could be either an opportunity or a threat, depending on your situation. For example:

  • Closing of offices has forced eDiscovery providers to offer their services remotely.

This could be a threat if your company wasn’t prepared to offer remote services when the pandemic hit. But it could be an opportunity if you were already providing a well-defined remote alternative for those services as your organization is now ahead of those who did not have a well-defined remote offering.

Regardless, the opportunities and threats derived from the COVID-19 pandemic are unique to each business, and it’s an ideal time to update your SWOT analysis to address them to maximize the success of your business unit.

 

Be sure to tune in to hear Doug Austin, Tom O’Connor, and Jim Gill discuss:
How to Conduct a Legal SWOT Analysis on 9/9!

In Honor of Juneteenth, CEO Dean Brown Reiterates Ipro’s Commitment to Diversity

Ipro commitment diversity

In honor of Juneteenth, the day the United States officially ended slavery, CEO Dean Brown sends this message regarding Ipro’s continued commitment to diversity and the defense of equal rights for all people.

“This has been a difficult and emotional time for all of us, and Ipro felt it was important to first listen and learn from Black voices. In light of the necessary conversations that are happening across our country now, I want to share where Ipro stands regarding these issues.

“Ipro sees value in each and every person. We remain committed to providing a working environment that does not tolerate racism or discrimination in any form. We foster a culture of open dialogue where we listen and learn first, while providing increased resources and outlets for sharing and support for our employees of all races, genders, sexual orientations, abilities, and religions.

  • Treat others with respect—the way you would want to be treated.
  • Defend equal rights for all people.
  • Participate in our democracy and speak up when you see a wrong.

“Ipro’s commitment isn’t new, but we stand behind it and affirm that we will continue to seek and support diversity.”

Workflow Woes: How Paralegals Can Create and Maintain Effective eDiscovery Processes

paralegals eDiscovery Workflows

Workflow Woes: How Paralegals Can Create and Maintain Effective eDiscovery Processes

JD Supra Readers Choice Top Author 2020Written by Jim Gill
Content Chief, Ipro

I have heard stories from paralegals about the challenges they face in trying to establish effective and repeatable workflows at their firms around Electronically Stored Information (ESI) and moving it through the discovery process. Today’s eDiscovery Blues was inspired by one of these stories, where the attorney had always organized documents with binder clips, and when it came to emails, the paralegal had to print those out, so they could be organized as well.

Hopefully by now, in 2020, litigation support teams understand how to leverage technology to save time, ensure accuracy, and pass on savings to their clients, even when working with a combination of ESI and hard copy documents (read this excellent Case Study with Whitney Farrell at PPS&C on how they were able to do exactly that); but it still raises the issue of workflows not being regularly reviewed or even created in the first place. On a recent Ipro webinar about creating workflows, a poll showed that a majority of the audience were working on a case-by-case basis when it came to process.

Brittany Thaler is an expert on eDiscovery workflows: she worked as a paralegal for 13 years, taught in Everest College’s paralegal training program, and is currently on the Ipro training team. “In my former life as a paralegal,” she says, “that was my task: Create a workflow, create a template, create a chart of what litigation looks like from complaint to appeal with all the tools we have available – whether that was with or without discovery tools – and when to begin trial preparation.” She continues:

“The key to making a good workflow isn’t the creation part. It’s how it actually functions in the real world. Be mindful that eDiscovery is changing the way a traditional discovery is being governed. Keep up on those changes and modify your workflows accordingly.”

Workflows shouldn’t be written and then left to gather dust. They need to evolve. That’s why it’s a good best practice to schedule a regular workflow evaluation every 6 to 12 months, to see how your teams are using the workflows and templates you’ve provided. What’s working, what isn’t working? Are they even being used?

From this you can get input from everyone involved – paralegals, litigation support, and attorneys – so that you can build repeatable processes that don’t require your team to reinvent the wheel with each case, but instead ensure accurate and efficient outcomes each time.

For more on how paralegals can create an effective eDiscovery workflow,
Listen to this webinar: Becoming the Indispensable eDiscovery Practitioner

Becoming the Indispensable eDiscovery Practitioner from Ipro Marketing on Vimeo.

 

Think You Have Extra Time to Prepare for CCPA Because of COVID-19? Not So Fast.

Prepare for CCPA

Think You Have Extra Time to Prepare for CCPA Because of COVID-19?  Not So Fast.

Written by Doug Austin, Editor of eDiscovery Today

On June 1, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra submitted proposed regulations under the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to the California Office of Administrative Law (OAL), according to a news release from the Office of the Attorney General of California (OAG).  OAL has 30 working days and an additional 60 calendar days under Executive Order N-40-20 related to the COVID-19 pandemic, to review the package for procedural compliance with the Administrative Procedure Act.  However, Becerra requested OAL to conduct an expedited review and declined to delay enforcement of CCPA from the original planned date of July 1st, but indicated he would exercise “prosecutorial discretion if warranted”.

CCPA was signed into law on June 28, 2018, and went into effect on January 1 of this year. The CCPA requires covered organizations to provide California consumers with a number of privacy-related rights, including the right to: (1) know which personal information an organization collects and how it shares that information with others, (2) request that an organization provide to the consumer the specific data elements of personal information it has collected, (3) demand that an organization delete the individual’s personal information, and (4) opt out of an organization’s “sales” of personal information to third parties. It applies to any organization that has California consumers, even if they’re not located in California.

“As our lives increasingly move online, our data privacy becomes more important than ever. The California Consumer Privacy Act, which gives consumers choice and control over personal information in the marketplace, is game-changing and historic,” said Attorney General Becerra in the news release. “Our regulations provide businesses and individuals with guidance on how to protect that choice and boost transparency, while continuing to unleash innovation. Businesses have had since January 1 to comply with the law, and we are committed to enforcing it starting July 1.”

The proposed regulations package includes the 29 page Final Text of Regulations and the 59 page Final Statement of Reasons, which also has six appendices regarding comments submitted and responses to those comments.

As noted in this blog post by Troutman Sanders, normally, for the CCPA regulations to be effective by the originally-anticipated July 1 enforcement date, AG Becerra should have submitted the proposed regulations to the OAL, and filed the approved rules with the Secretary of State no later than May 31.  But, in responding to requests to delay enforcement, Becerra said this:

“The OAG has considered and determined that delaying the implementation of these regulations is not more effective in carrying out the purpose and intent of the CCPA. The modified rules, which include regulations on employment-related information, were released on February 10, 2020 and revised on March 11, 2020. Thus, businesses have been aware that these requirements could be imposed as part of the OAG’s regulations. Indeed, many of the regulations are restatements of a business’ obligations under the CCPA, which went into effect on January 1, 2020…To the extent that the regulations require incremental compliance, the OAG may exercise prosecutorial discretion if warranted, depending on the particular facts at issue. Prosecutorial discretion permits the OAG to choose which entities to prosecute, whether to prosecute, and when to prosecute…Thus, any regulation that delays implementation of the regulations is not necessary.”

So, as far as Becerra is concerned, your organization should have already been planning to be compliant with CCPA as the Final Text of Proposed Regulations is identical in substance to the Second Modified Regulations issued back on March 27.  But, it seems a lot of organizations are still not ready, just as many weren’t ready for Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), when it went into effect in May 2018.  It’s more important than ever for organizations to track their data, make sure their privacy policy is up to date, develop processes for consumer requests and provide appropriate training to their employees to comply with the policy.  Discovery isn’t just for litigation anymore; it’s also about having a discovery program in place to meet your data privacy compliance needs.  And, while many companies don’t have active litigation which requires a structured approach to discovery, data privacy compliance is a universal need for every company.  I’m sure the level of preparedness within your organization will factor into the “prosecutorial discretion” that Becerra mentioned in his comments should your company violate data privacy rights of California consumers.  Time is almost up!

As part of the Educational partnership between Ipro and eDiscovery Today that was announced earlier this month, I’m excited to say that I will be writing a new weekly blog post for Ipro’s blog, to supplement the excellent educational content that Jim Gill and the Ipro team regularly provide!  Just like I do on eDiscovery Today, I will write educational posts about a variety of topics related to eDiscovery, cybersecurity and data privacy. So, look for a post from me each week here!

What is In-Place Preservation and How Does It Affect Your eDiscovery Workflow

In-Place Preservation

What is In-Place Preservation and How Does It Affect Your eDiscovery Workflow

JD Supra Readers Choice Top Author 2020Written by Jim Gill
Content Chief, Ipro

There has been a lot of discussion around In-Place Preservation (IPP) over the past few years, but many in the legal industry are still unsure of its potential for eDiscovery, data privacy, and compliance.

A good first step is to define what we mean by IPP and how that changes whether you’re talking about data retention policies or legal hold.

For retention, preserving data in-place simply means you retain the data where it’s actually being used, rather than moving it to a separate archiving solution or to a separate location the way we would move paper boxes to a warehouse (which is exactly the struggle Rick Compliance is facing in this week’s eDiscovery Blues™ comic.)

For a legal hold, the goal is to ensure data is locked down automatically, without relying on the custodian to do it, so that it cannot be altered or deleted, as it’s subject to impending litigation.

As Mike Quartararo, president of ACEDS, puts it, “In-Place Preservation to me is one of those safeguards that you bake into your workflow, your eDiscovery process, and particularly the preservation process, that is really designed to make your life easier down the road. If you don’t preserve it properly upfront, the likelihood of success later down the road is reduced.”

The ability to set retention rules on enterprise email servers has been available for some time, but a challenge that organizations face today with preserving data, particularly in-place, is how to do this across the multiple data sources that are in constant use:

  • Email sources like Outlook and G-Suite
  • Messaging apps like Teams and Slack
  • Cloud repositories like Box, OneDrive, and Google Drive
  • Video conferencing apps like Zoom

These are never really frozen in time. So if data is locked or preserved in-place in response to litigation, the functionality of those tools is affected, which disrupts business.

So IPP in terms of legal hold may require creative software solutions that can preserve data in-place, while allowing regular business operations to continue. No small feat, but absolutely a reality which can push legal teams to the next level for defensibility, security, and efficiency.

Want to hear a full discussion on IPP and In-Place EDA?
Listen to this deep dive from Mike Quartararo from ACEDS, Frederic Bourget from NetGovern,
and Ryan Joyce and Jim Gill from Ipro!

6 Ways the Ipro / Netgovern Partnership Can Jump Start Your eDiscovery Process

Ipro Netgovern eDiscovery Partnership

6 Ways the Ipro / Netgovern Partnership Can Jump Start Your eDiscovery Process

For nearly 20 years, Montreal’s NetGovern has supported a range of private organizations and public institutions with information governance needs, helping them meet data compliance requirements, safeguard personal information, and protect reputations while securing sensitive data. In January 2020, Ipro announced a strategic partnership with NetGovern, providing a new approach to performing Early Data Assessment (EDA). This initiative will enable clients to rapidly review relevant data before it is collected, dramatically lowering expensive eDiscovery costs.

One person well-acquainted with the challenges presented when interacting with Electronically Stored Information (ESI) is Frederic Bourget, CTO at NetGovern. The chief difficulty of this work is the same that Bourget encounters in software development: the result is unknown at the start. To encourage more efficiency, programmers today utilize the agile practice of iterative development, in which each step requires a discrete objective, deadline, and evaluation. In a recent blog, Frederic wrote, “The general concept of eDiscovery is to collect as much ESI as you can—to avoid missing anything—and then to review the data through an efficient, industrialized process.” However, he continues by saying, “the efficiency gains of this linear process come at a higher cost of rework. eDiscovery is more of an investigation process. As a better understanding develops, you have the ability to return to the ESI source in an iterative way to build the case timeline and presentation.”

And that’s what the NetGovern / Ipro partnership does: it re-imagines the eDiscovery process with a focus on agility. Here are 6 other ways this partnership benefits companies:

COST REDUCTION

Leveraging the right technological tools creates a number of important benefits. First and foremost: minimizing review costs by reducing the time required to sift through large quantities of pertinent data.

“If clients can interact with ESI early in an eDiscovery case, and on an ongoing basis, they can interactively process, review, and collect only the data that is relevant.”

RISK REDUCTION

Delivering less data to an opposing party or legal-service provider reduces the risk of data breaches and loss.

“Moving large swaths of data and storing multiple copies under unknown security conditions is a risky proposition in a world where all organizations have fallen, at least once, for phishing attacks.”

EARLY DATA / EARLY CASE ASSESSMENT (EDA / ECA)

Few lawsuits ever go through the full range of procedures to trial. Rapid resolution and minimal business disruption are more likely with direct access to data for assessment and being able to perform interactive investigation as the case evolves.

“Facts speak volumes and provide serious leverage.” 

KEYWORD SELECTION

Some keywords may reveal no relevant information at all. Creating an effective keyword set requires a thorough insight of the data at hand.

“Having visibility into the data allows you to assess if the [terms] are too broad and would result in collecting too much data, breaking proportionality, and putting your confidential business information at risk.”

USABILITY

The variety of locations and platforms companies use to manage communications and information can impede deadline-sensitive eDiscovery, particularly when legal teams must rely on IT, InfoSec, or outside firms to gather data.

“Providing intuitive and user-friendly tools to the legal team, to be able to run searches and collections, puts the efficiency of the process directly into their hands. Imagine being able to move seamlessly between collection, processing, and review all within one pane of glass.”

CONFIDENTIALITY

As with strategically limiting the volume of data on the front end, limiting the number of people involved also reduces risk.

“If legal can operate within their team boundary, they can perform investigations without having to explain to IT, or to an external firm, who and what are being investigated. Internal affairs stay quiet and are handled confidentially.”

To learn more about how the Ipro + NetGovern partnership can benefit you
Listen to this webinar featuring speakers from both companies and co-sponsored with ACEDS:

In-Place Preservation, Hype or Cutting Edge?

eDiscovery Software Gives Distributed Legal Teams the Agility & Collaboration They Need

distributed eDiscovery teams

eDiscovery Software Gives Distributed Legal Teams the Agility & Collaboration They Need

JD Supra Readers Choice Top Author 2020Written by Jim Gill
Content Chief, Ipro

For the past several months, the legal community has had to quickly adapt to the reality of working remotely in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Luckily, we live in a day and age where distributed eDiscovery teams can, for the most part, continue the work at hand, through the use and adoption of technology.

We’ve all become accustomed to communication through video chat platforms, and have even come to rely on these interactions, not only for teams within an organization, but for connection with the larger legal community (shout outs here to Ari Kaplan’s Virtual Lunch Series and David Cowen and his Cowen Café Series for their efforts on this front).

But more than Zoom calls keeping legal departments connected, even when they are truly “in-house” — like our eDiscovery Blues hero, Rick Compliance and his team above – it’s important to remember the eDiscovery software and both it’s security and agility which allows legal teams to not only stay in touch but continue their work.

Aaron Swenson, Product Director at Ipro, shared, “I think today, more than ever, problems that have always existed are magnified with teams becoming distributed practically overnight: the problems of agility, consistency, and collaboration. Before, co-located teams were able to walk over and talk about how to review a document or architect a review. Which seemed great, but a byproduct is that it limits consistency and review power to only the team that’s co-located. Today’s data is created by globally distributed teams, scaling up without boundaries. Approaching this problem, where review is a team sport without physical boundaries, is a perspective I think isn’t just a necessity today, but something that will give those firms embracing it competitive advantages over the long term.”

Which is why it’s so important to leverage eDiscovery technology that gives team members secure remote access for data ingestion and processing, as well as enabling collaboration with internal and external stakeholders.

That way, whether your legal team is in-house, in-office, in-kitchen, in-hotel, or in-the-backyard, the work of eDiscovery continues securely, defensibly, and seamlessly.

Read more of Ipro’s original legal comic “eDiscovery Blues” every Friday!

 

Sharing Knowledge and Strengthening Education, Ipro Is Excited To Partner with eDiscovery Today

Ipro and eDiscovery Today Partnership

Ipro, the global leader in eDiscovery solutions, is pleased to announce an educational content partnership with eDiscovery Today.

Founded by industry leader Doug Austin, eDiscovery Today is a daily resource for eDiscovery and eDisclosure professionals seeking to keep up with trends, best practices, and case law in electronic discovery, cybersecurity, and data privacy. With this partnership, Ipro and eDiscovery Today will broaden their ability to highlight, share, and co-create the highest quality educational and knowledge-sharing thought-leadership covering all segments of the legal technology industry, including Corporate Legal Teams, Law Firms, Government Agencies, and Legal Service Providers.

“Doug Austin is a strong voice in the LegalTech community,” shared Jim Gill, Content Chief for Ipro. “It’s an honor to partner with him and broaden eDiscovery knowledge for our community. Ipro is excited to invest in education showcasing Doug’s insights through the rapidly growing thought-leadership program at Ipro.”

“Ipro has been making eDiscovery easier for the legal community literally for decades through their meaningful solutions and their breadth of educational resources, including their blog, white papers, and webinars,” said Doug Austin, Editor of the new eDiscovery Today blog.  “I am excited to announce Ipro as an Educational Sponsor of eDiscovery Today, and I look forward to working together to bring even more educational content and resources to the legal community.”

As part of their educational partnership, Ipro and eDiscovery Today will also be co-sponsoring a thought leader podcast series starting in Q3 of 2020. Conducting and publishing interviews with eDiscovery and cybersecurity experts, Ipro is able to bring thought leadership to the forefront for the legal community.

Look for this podcast series and other additional content initiatives coming soon from the Ipro and eDiscovery Today educational content sponsorship.

About eDiscovery Today blog
Authored and edited by industry expert Doug Austin, eDiscovery Today is the only daily go-to resource for eDiscovery and eDisclosure professionals seeking to keep up with trends, best practices, and case law in electronic discovery, cybersecurity and data privacy. Doug has over thirty years of experience as an industry thought leader providing eDiscovery best practices, legal technology consulting, software product management and technical project management services for numerous Corporate and Government clients.

About Ipro Tech, LLC
Ipro is a global leader in eDiscovery technology used by legal professionals to streamline discovery of electronic data through presentation at trial. Ipro draws upon decades of innovation to deliver high-performance software, services, and support, bundled as a solution and deployed the way you want it—Desktop, On-prem, Cloud, or Hybrid—significantly reducing the cost and complexity of eDiscovery. For more information, visit www.Iprotech.com.