Category Archives: Services

How Case Managers Bridge the Gap Between eDiscovery Software & Services: An Interview with Lori Bregenzer

eDiscovery case managers

Ipro’s hybrid approach to eDiscovery means we’re more than just a software producer: we bring a true partnership to the table via our Case Managers, whose ultimate goal is to become an extension of your team – to know the details of your data, the deadlines that are looming, and provide options for the most efficient and stress-free experience as possible.

As a way of highlighting this partnership, we’re featuring our Case Managers here in the Ipro Newsroom.

Lori Bregenzer brings over 20 years of litigation technology experience to the Ipro Services Team. Her background as the Litigation Technology Manager for a large law firm and subsequently as the owner of a boutique litigation software training and consulting company has built a solid foundation of both technical and customer-focused skills which she leverages in her role as Case Manager for Ipro.

Here are the highlights of our conversation:

What makes Ipro Case Managers unique in the eDiscovery industry?

“Decades of industry experience using, training, supporting, and consulting on litigation technology. In my positions prior to joining the Ipro team, I struggled to find a service provider who took the time to learn the intricacies of my projects. Quite often, my project was treated as ‘just business’. It’s very rare in this industry to find a provider who strives to becomes a true partner.

“We know the Ipro solutions better than anyone else. We also know our competitor’s software, because we’ve actually used it in the past. Our goal is to become an extension of your case team, bringing value by building in efficiencies, custom workflows, and unparalleled technical skills.”

How does an Ipro Case Manager help clients?

“We take time to learn the details of your project so that we can suggest ways to simplify the complex discovery tasks you face every day. Our goal is to ease the many pain points of processing, document review, and production.”

What are some of the biggest challenges / trends you’re seeing in the eDiscovery industry?

“Collecting, organizing, and managing the ever-expanding volume of data involved in litigation today.”

How does Ipro generally and Ipro’s Case Managers specifically solve these eDiscovery issues?

“Ipro is completely scalable in our solutions. No project is too big or too small. Ipro’s Case Managers have years of experience dealing with all levels of projects and the many difficult processing and production requests that invariably come up.

“This personalized approach to eDiscovery services is what draws me to the Case Manager position. As your Case Manager, I make it my business to build a relationship with your legal team. We’ll discuss your data processing requirements up front and develop a game plan to get your review off to a quick and successful start. I’ll point out ways to conduct document review more efficiently, and thus more cost effectively. Additionally, I’ll know when the deadlines are coming and proactively work with you to not only meet them but beat them.”

To Learn more about Ipro’s Managed eDiscovery Services, visit us here!

Why are Managed Services on the Rise in eDiscovery? 4 Scenarios to Shed Some Light on the Matter

eDiscovery managed services

Why are Managed Services on the Rise in eDiscovery? 4 Scenarios to Shed Some Light on the Matter

A few years ago (and maybe still) a lot of people in legaltech spoke of the idea of a single legal team doing everything in-house – end to end – with the help of technology. And this is definitely possible. But only a tiny percentage are able to do this. Because let’s face it – even with the latest technology, eDiscovery is a complicated endeavor, and it would take a very mature legal team, including an eDiscovery-savvy IT department to handle every situation. That’s why managed services are on the rise, with law firms and corporations utilizing them as part of their eDiscovery process.

In a recent article on his blog eDiscovery Strategy, Chuck Kellner laid out a really great overview of some of the reasons why this is happening.

To expand on that, here are some (but certainly not all) situations where eDiscovery services could come into play.

  1. eDiscovery On-Demand

Many law firms (particularly smaller or boutique firms) don’t want to invest in eDiscovery software, infrastructure, or personnel, but it doesn’t mean they aren’t having to deal with Electronically Stored Information (ESI). If the document count stays relatively low, they can usually find a work-around using manual processes (which has its own problems). But when something comes in like an Intellectual Property suit involving a large quantity of documents, manual processes or even legacy technology doesn’t cut it when you have a short turnaround time required to process, review, and produce the ESI needed to deliver a favorable result in the case.

This is where managed services come in. You’re assigned a dedicated case manager who can assist with strategy and planning on how to execute everything including the initial data collection, processing, review, and production. They can reduce your document universe headed to review (which is the largest area of cost in eDiscovery) by leveraging ECA and advanced analytics. They can even help you set up proven review workflows to help your team get the facts as quickly as possible. And after the matter is concluded, the law firm now has a relationship with this case manager, who already understands their firm’s unique needs should another case arise where they need help.

  1. Complex and Specialty Discovery

Just because a firm has eDiscovery processes and technology in place, doesn’t mean they’re prepared to handle every scenario. Custom and complex discovery requests are one example. Let’s say a law firm had a request from an attorney that would only review documents in consolidated PDFs. The attorney provided 4 PSTs, one for each custodian, and in return wanted all emails and their attachments in a single pdf, and all documents within a PST placed in a single pdf portfolio. The final deliverable is essentially 4 giant PDFs. Some may label this an overly complex request and reject it. But a managed services team that specializes in these things can leverage their processing engine to convert PSTs into single files and repackage them into single layered PDFs.

  1. Corporate Legal Teams

As I said before, it takes a mature legal team to deal with complex eDiscovery, particularly when you have large datasets and start moving to the right-side of the EDRM (processing, review, and production). Corporate teams often deal with legal holds, data preservation and collection, but will call in an assist from managed services for help after that.

One thing that is of value to corporate teams when it comes to managed services is having a dedicated eDiscovery Project Manager to assist with building a workflow that is comprehensive and cost-effective. When it comes to processing your collected ESI, most in-house corporate teams don’t have an automated and scalable solution. Today, datasets can become unwieldy and with the ever-growing number of filetypes, things can get tricky. Managed Services can quickly and accurately get things moved into Early Case Assessment (ECA), so that data can be culled and streamlined and only the most relevant documents are sent to review. And then there are production deadlines. Services teams can build production templates ahead of time, image relevant documents proactively as they become available, and do a thorough QC of the production to ensure the job is done right and on time.

Besides all of these things, corporations who may regularly face litigation can reuse ESI processing, review, and production histories. They simply pay a flat fee to host the data and can use it again without having to go through (and pay for) the process should it become relevant in another case.

  1. Predictable Pricing

This aspect of managed services applies to both law firms and corporate legal teams. The cost of eDiscovery, particularly the review stage, can be both expensive and hard to predict. Managed services often are billed based on the amount of data rather than an hourly basis, which provides much more insight into costs at the beginning rather than having to wait until the job is completed. This allows you to process your data, weed out irrelevant ESI, and get a look at the facts of your case before review, while only paying for data processed. If you decide to keep this data hosted for future use or reference, then a flat-fee for hosting applies, which is a much more cost-effective approach than sending your entire collection through review and having to pick your jaw up off the floor when you get the bill.

Conclusion:

There are many other scenarios that may come into play when it comes to applying managed services to eDiscovery, but it’s clear why legal teams use them. Technology alone can make a difference, but having the support, expertise, and experience of a technology partner can allow you to handle cases of any size and complexity without the stress of having to do everything on your own.

 

Find Out How Ipro’s Services Team Can Help You with Your Next eDiscovery Dilemma!

 

Written by Jim Gill
Ipro Content Writer

Do Your Numbers Survive the Tank?

With almost all marketing associated with eDiscovery, Law Firms, Providers and Software companies alike tout that an advantage of using Acme Company is “Efficiency,” but how are people measuring efficiency? A year ago, at our Ipro Innovations conference, we had a breakout session where we posed the question “Do you know your cost per GB?” Of the 40 or so attendees at that session, not a single person raised their hand. Unfortunately, I don’t think anyone was surprised by that non-reaction. Yet here we are claiming “I am the most efficient person in all the land”.

For those who know me, I am an avid fan of the show Shark Tank. I am always impressed by how well prepared the “Pitchers” are with being able to regurgitate their numbers- cost per unit, cost to ship, if we can get a bigger Purchase Order we can use a manufacturer that will drop the price per unit by $0.32. Why can’t our industry do the same? Do we care? Is the pricing model too convoluted? Is it impossible to calculate all the factors? Project Management, Software, Hardware, Storage, Technicians, to name a few. Everyone states that pricing is a “Race to the Bottom,” so there is more pressure on companies involved with hosting to be as aggressive as possible on pricing.

But if efficiency is truly important and a market differentiator, shouldn’t it be emphasized from the top down? When speaking with Chief Officers, Directors and others involved with the bottom line they are interested in how to become efficient. Experience tells us, that’s where the discussion stops. When a company is looking to evaluate a new solution, tool or workflow, the details are usually handed off to an analyst of some sort to go through a spreadsheet of some “374” line items of features they must test. Rarely in my experience have I seen a spreadsheet like this contain something associated with “efficiency.” More importantly, if the analyst decrees that the solution they are evaluating doesn’t have “27” items they want then that solution is deemed a non-solution. But wait, what if a solution allowed you to gain 32% more efficiency overall and those items deemed as non-starters only pertain to 6% of your projects. Does the 32% efficiency on the 94% outweigh the 6%? Do you have a way to calculate that information? Shouldn’t it be weighed? Does the analyst have any guidance as to how to measure that?

I was talking to a CTO just a few weeks back after Legal Week in New York, and we were both lamenting the perception that our industry is so unique we can’t treat our businesses like others outside our industry. Business is business is business, and if you don’t know your numbers, how can you make decisions on pricing, staffing, ROI, TCO? How do you teach your staff about the importance of efficiency? Data sizes are not going down, but pricing is. Wouldn’t the ultimate goal be to do more with the same? With outsiders starting to take an active interest in the direction of eDiscovery maybe it’s time to start paying attention to more than the top line revenue and EBITDA alone. And for some, how do you get an offer from one of the Sharks?