Category Archives: TrialDirector

Attorneys Need Presentation Tools Specifically Designed for Trial

Because the Courtroom isn’t the Classroom—

Historically, teachers have used a variety of technology display tools for presenting information to their students; a photocopy on transparency paper via an overhead projector or a video camera hooked up to a TV on a rolling cart to show clear images from a book. Fast forward a few more years when smart podiums came along, giving teachers the ability to connect a laptop to a projector and show images, word docs, and videos. These were all powerful in their day.

Often, the presentation needs of teachers and attorneys have a lot of similarities, gaining the right focus of your audience, but attorneys have much more at stake; they need a dynamic presentation tool to meet their needs in the courtroom. Yet many still use PowerPoint, document cameras, and even foam boards to present evidence to the jury. 

The law firm Salvi, Schostok & Pritchard were doing just that 4 years ago, when they realized they needed far more control and flexibility over their presentations. That’s when they switched to TrialDirector as their go-to presentation software for trial. The firm attributes TrialDirector’s seamless flow, the ability to call up exhibits on the fly, video deposition tools, and how easily the presentation integrates with the attorney’s dialogue as having a powerful impact on the jury to help them tell their story and provide a positive outcome for their clients. 

With TrialDirector 360 you can: 

  • Present virtually any type of document or media from your PC or laptop 
  • Streamline your entire trial preparation and presentation process with one tool 
  • Organize transcripts, video depo’s, and documents for offline presentation 
  • Impress juries and clients through easy-to-present, impactful multimedia presentations 
  • Easily collaborate with multiple users working on a centrally stored case 

Most of the time we stick with what we know and make it work, often not realizing there may be a better solution out there. Trial presentation is no different, attorneys need a competitive edge in the courtroom and TrialDirector 360 can give them that edge.  

TrialDirector 360 is here!

Trial Director 360

Tempe, Ariz., June 25, 2018 — Ipro Tech, LLC, a worldwide leader in eDiscovery solutions, announced today the release of the all-new TrialDirector 360, the most widely-used trial presentation application available. TrialDirector 360 streamlines the trial presentation process with powerful tools to professionally present case evidence in court.

“We’ve made an already proven and robust product even better while keeping the features our clients love about TrialDirector” said Derek Miller, VP of Product Management.

In addition to the powerful and well-known presentation features, the new TrialDirector 360 includes:

• New database structure to increase reliability and performance

• Updated user interface with customized layouts to fit your workflow

• Ability to share your case and collaborate with others during your trial preparation

• Transcript Management tool with advanced video editing options, including redactions

• Bulk update exhibits in minutes with dynamic labels and resequencing options

• Easily compare designations by party with options to edit video clips on-the-fly

TrialDirector 360 is loaded with new features that simplify the entire trial prep workflow for legal teams. Visit our TrialDirector 360 page to learn more or email sales@iprotech.com

Attending ILTACON 18? Click here to schedule a private demo of TrialDirector 360 or any Ipro product.

About Ipro Tech, LLC

Founded in 1989, Ipro is a global leader in the development of advanced eDiscovery software solutions. With the addition of the industry leader in trial presentation, TrialDirector 360, Ipro provides solutions from discovery to trial.

TrialDirector vs. PowerPoint

You put a lot of time and effort into preparing your case for trial, but how are you going to effectively show your case to the jury? TrialDirector was designed specifically for trial (as you can tell by the name) and is the leading trial presentation software because of the following features:

  • Organize witness workbooks – quickly drag and drop items into a witness folder
  • Apply exhibit numbers – add trial exhibit numbers and other unique identifiers to your case items
  • Search transcripts and create designations – generate PDF reports to print, email, and share
  • Make exhibit lists – TrialDirector creates Word documents that you can save, print, or copy into other files
  • Present documents and video in a variety of ways to maximize your presence in front of the jury
  • Zoom, highlight, and use a variety of mark-up tools for maximum impact and understanding

“Eh I’m good, I use PowerPoint.”

We agree that PowerPoint is an excellent presentation program. It creates linear presentations that you can make in advance. So why take the time to learn TrialDirector? Putting aside all the functions listed above (which PowerPoint can’t do, by the way), let’s focus on the presentation.

When you’re presenting to a jury, you need to adapt, be quick on your feet, and prepare for the unexpected. For instance, a document might suddenly be admissible, or the witness answers your question in court differently than in his deposition. What do you do – take a few minutes to create a new PowerPoint slide at counsel’s table? Request a recess? Make the jury wait in silence? You don’t want to lose the impact of expediency.

TrialDirector lets you present any document, any time. You just type in the exhibit number and hit enter; that’s it. You can now continue your questioning about this now-admissible document without missing a beat. When you finish, return to your regularly scheduled presentation organized in a workbook. It’s seamless for you and transparent to the jury.

But don’t worry…

PowerPoint has a place in your case and it has a place in TrialDirector! We know that PowerPoint is ideal for opening statements. Create your opening in PowerPoint and easily load it into your TrialDirector case. TrialDirector will display your PowerPoint presentation and you can move through the slides at your pace, just as you would in PowerPoint.

Ready for closing arguments? Insert the images you showed the jury through TrialDirector into your PowerPoint closing. This will enhance memory and recall. Jurors will not only remember the document, they’ll remember what you showed them.

So, you use PowerPoint? That’s not a problem, because TrialDirector doesn’t make you choose. Use the comfort of PowerPoint along with the flexibility and power of TrialDirector to make your case.

How You Can Use Any Software on Your Mac

Despite the hours and hours of preparation before a trial, one single decision or piece of evidence could completely change the course of the case.

You are able to think and react quickly, but unfortunately, unfamiliar technology can be a stumbling block in a dynamic and stressful environment. Even well-practiced lawyers struggle when trying to use new computers, operating systems, and software programs in an ever-changing situation.

Your confidence as a presenter forms the foundation of effective trial presentations, so during trial preparation is not the time to be learning how to navigate a new computer. If you use a Mac daily, that should not change when you enter the courtroom.

Although TrialDirector and other associated software (TimeCoder Pro, DepoView, etc.) are designed for the Windows operating system, there are a variety of available methods that will allow you to enjoy the capabilities of your Mac along with all the features of TrialDirector software:

  1. Boot Camp: Don’t worry, this option doesn’t require you to participate in physically-exhausting activities; preparing and presenting in trial is demanding enough. Boot Camp is a program created by Apple that allows you to install the Windows operating system onto your Mac, so you can have two operating systems on one computer. This method gives you great stability and smooth performance with your software; however, while using Windows, you cannot access any of your iOS applications.
  2. WINE: This option requires a little more effort than grabbing a bottle of your favorite beverage and chatting it up with friends. Certain types of WINEs (Windows Emulators), such as WineBottler and CrossOver, allow you to run Windows-based programs on iOS-based systems. You simply download and install the Windows Emulator, and then your software will run on iOS using the WINE. These emulators work similarly to Boot Camp, but not all programs are fully supported, so you might run into some issues depending on the software you’re trying to use.
  3. Virtual Machine: This sounds like the most fun out of the three options, like an exciting virtual reality experience or a time-traveling device. Although a virtual machine isn’t quite that futuristic, it can be extremely helpful when trying to run Windows-based programs on iOS. Basically, it runs a virtual copy of the Windows operating system on your Mac, which allows you to use any software that is designed for Windows. Virtual Machines such as VMWare Fusion and Parallels Desktop do require more processing power and RAM, but you’ll have fewer problems.

Let us know if you have other methods for using TrialDirector with iOS, or if you have any general trial presentation tips.

Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn, or learn more about TrialDirector and how it can help you by visiting our website. Already have TrialDirector? Check out one of our training courses.

iPad vs. PC: Which One Should You Use?

We all love our tablets.

They’re light, portable, and intuitive. Many computer tasks can be done efficiently on a tablet, and as a society, we are huge fans.

Both tablets and laptops make a huge impact in the courtroom when it comes to trial presentation technology, but every case is unique and each presenter has different needs. We compare the differences between the two so you can choose the option that is best for your circumstances.

For those “pacers” out there, an iPad allows you to walk freely around the room and present from wherever you’re standing. A laptop is a little more restrictive; you can still pace, but you need to return to the laptop to move forward in your presentation or rely on someone else to call up your exhibits. However, presenting with an iPad requires you to set-up a private, wireless network to use Apple TV and similar products, and there is always the concern of becoming wirelessly disconnected in the middle of your presentation.

When using TrialDirector on a computer, you have much more storage and a higher processing speed, which allows you to handle a higher volume of documents, photos, and videos. Due to the lower processing speed, TrialDirector for iPad is great when using a small number of exhibits but not for managing larger case files.

Within the PC software, you have access to more tools and features while preparing and presenting your case, while you can use your iPad to make fewer, more basic edits and play pre-edited clips. This allows the iPad application to have a simpler experience and interface. However, working with an iPad requires you to load sensitive documents through iTunes, Dropbox, Box, or any other file sharing application, but you get to skip that step if you’re using a computer.

With a PC, you also have access to the most-used aspects of TrialDirector software. You can easily:

  • Retrieve and display exhibits faster
  • Create or adjust deposition clips, even while you’re in trial
  • Search transcripts and create detailed search results
  • Import synched transcripts
  • Easily cut deposition clips
  • Choose from eight different playback options
  • Link exhibits to deposition clips

Ultimately, the choice is yours. You want to do your best while presenting, and so we recommend using the software the allows you to manage your case your way you while also allowing you to be comfortable and confident in the courtroom.

During your next trial, which one are you going to use?

Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn, or learn more about TrialDirector and how it can help you by visiting our website. Already have TrialDirector? Check out one of our training courses.

How Your Trial Could Have Gone Differently

For Jenna, it was one of those days.

The kind of day that just drags on in a perfect storm of bad luck. Her computer crashed right before she finished writing her quarterly report. For some reason, her office smelled like a rotting dairy farm, and she managed to spill her lunch all over her new blouse.

It was just one of those days.

As she flipped through her mail while walking through the front door of her tiny apartment, she paused on an official-looking envelope. “Official Jury Summons Smith County” was printed in a bright yellow box. Just like that, she knew the universe was working against her.

With no valid reason to be excused from jury duty, Jenna dutifully, yet grudgingly arrived at the appointed time and location to offer her services as a juror. When she arrived, she was amazed by the diversity of people who would be serving with her; people from a variety of backgrounds and education levels, all working together for a common goal.

But after the amazement came the worry. Jenna had earned a Bachelor’s degree in Accounting and considered herself fairly educated, and even she was stressed about understanding the court proceedings and vocabulary used by the judge and attorney. But there were other jurors who didn’t have the same educational opportunities as her, and she wondered how was she supposed to reach a verdict with people who were so different from her.

After everyone had entered the courtroom, the trial began. Jenna’s thoughts quickly left the case as she started to think about the work she needed to catch up on and when she would go grocery shopping. Occasionally, she would tune back into the trial, but it was hard to pay attention when they were using so many big words that she didn’t understand and showing documents that didn’t mean anything to her. If she wasn’t getting anything out of this, she doubted that any of the other jurors were understanding anything.

Pause.

Does this sound familiar? It’s rare to find a group of jurors that are actively engaged during most of a trial, let alone the entirety of it. In a perfect world, each jury would be composed of 12 people from diverse backgrounds who are also well-versed in legal affairs while being wholeheartedly committed to pursuing justice. Since that situation isn’t a plausible option, we go for the next best thing: an appealing presentation.

Think back to your days in school when a professor would spend ten minutes writing on the board, and two minutes in you were mentally checked out; your jury isn’t any different. You can’t afford to spend time setting up documents, zooming in on images, and fast-forwarding to a specific segment of a deposition. You need to be able to present your case clearly and concisely so that the jury can understand and remember your presentation.

Yes, it takes a lot of time and effort to prepare a seamless case presentation beforehand; but if it helps the jury to reach the desired verdict, isn’t it worth it?

Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn, or learn more about TrialDirector and how it can help you by visiting our website. Already have TrialDirector? Check out one of our training courses

Understanding Databases and How to Avoid the Dreaded “No Image Available” Screen in Trial Presentation

Here’s a story you may be familiar with:

Dan, a young and ambitious attorney, strides confidently into the courtroom. Sure, he’s a little nervous, but he has practiced this presentation several times, and he knows he can convince the jury in his favor. Plus, he’s using powerful trial presentation software to help him out. What could go wrong?

The opposition, judge and jurors arrive, and it’s finally time for Dan to begin. He brings up the first image of his presentation on the big screen and starts to talk. He starts out strong. He already feels a rhythm. The jury is hanging on his every word, but then disaster occurs. He clicks to the next image in his presentation, but instead of the picture he’s expecting, a different image with the words “No Image Available” dominates the screen.

 

No Image Available
The dreaded “No Image Available” screen.

Dan fumbles for a precious second or two, but then he gets back on track. He’s embarrassed, but he breezes over it. He makes a quick joke, sees some of the jury chuckle, and clicks to the next image. Thankfully, the next image is there and he quickly gets back to his rhythm. It was just a hiccup, he’s not ruined.

He continues clicking through his images, building up steam for the big reveal at the end, but it happens again.

“No Image Available”

Dan is devastated, his face is flushed red. He can see members of the jury rolling their eyes. The judge is glaring at him. Dan quickly finishes up his remarks and sits down, fuming over what just happened.

Where did the images go? They were all there when he practiced yesterday, how did they just magically disappear?

What went wrong?

Dan fell victim to a misunderstanding of how the technology he was using worked. But before we get into what exactly happened to Dan, let’s go over some basics of that technology. Specifically, databases.

Understanding Database Basics

Whether Dan knew it or not, he was using a database to reach and work with his case documents.

Folders and files in a database
Databases help store and organize metadata, or information, about items.

In the most basic terms, a database is an organized collection of metadata, or in other words information, that describes items within the database. As it applies to Dan and other attorneys using trial presentation software, a database is a sort of metadata repository of all the images and other documents that Dan puts into it.

However, it is important to note and reiterate that the database doesn’t hold the actual images themselves, but the metadata or information about those images: Where the images are located, what they are named, when he entered them into the database, and any other information Dan decides to enter.

Aside from just being trial presentation software, trial preparation and presentation applications also serve as minor document management systems which often use a database. That’s what you’re actually working with when you import files into a case, organize them, and mark them up.

Working with a database is a little different than you might think because even though you’re working with the actual files, those files are not housed within the application itself.

If it helps, think of using a database like using an Elmo document projector or some other projection machine. The image that is being projected onto the screen or wall is not the real, original image. It is a reference to the real image being projected on the Elmo.

In a database, the files are only referenced. Therefore, if the referenced files are ever moved, it breaks the application’s connection.

See where we’re going with this?

When Dan opens an image in his application, the application is using the information in the database to find the image and show it to him in the document viewer.

That is one of the many things that are misunderstood about databases. When you import a file into these systems, you’re basically just telling the program where to look to find the image. If that image is ever moved, then the application won’t know where to find it.

Check out these quick tips on naming files to make working with a database easier!

Benefits of Databases

So, why do these software tools use databases? Why not just house the files right in the application so that you never have the “No Image Available” problem?

We’ll approach this question conceptually. A given case has the potential to have several thousand documents, even tens of thousands, in various states of progress. Not to mention the many many hours of deposition and evidence video. While we don’t recommend you import all your case documents into your trial presentation tool, you’re going to want to at least import several hundred that might be relevant to your presentation at trial.

Any one image file can have a large file size on its own. One video, like a deposition, can be several hours long, making the file size much much larger than an image. These large sizes present several problems.

First, it would take a large amount of time to actually get the files into the software. Then, once they are there, you need a system to keep track of all the information being processed along with each document. Having to manually look for each file as if you were looking through the Windows file explorer for each of the thousands of documents in your case would eat up a lot of precious time.

We are extremely aware of the precious time of attorneys.

Instead of all that noise, we can use a database. A database puts all the information you need about a document right in front of you in an easy-to-read manner, letting you get back to what matters: strategizing, developing arguments, and winning your case.

A database makes everything much faster, more efficient and gets you what you need. Since it only references the files that are already on your computer, the file size when importing documents becomes much smaller and much faster to import. It also makes tracking all the information related to each file much easier and provides the possibility of adding information as a document goes through the case process.

In short, databases make working with loads of case documents much more streamlined and efficient, speedily getting you the information you need. All it takes on your part is a little more basic knowledge of what a database is and how to approach using one.

What about Dan?

To sum up, after a file is imported into a trial presentation tool, if somebody moves that file, it breaks the path the database uses to find it and the application can’t find the file anymore, resulting in “No Image Available”.

So what happened to Dan? Remember him? Turns out, even though he had practiced and made sure his presentation was ready to go, his paralegal, Rachel, was still working well into the night on the case. While she worked, she had to move some files around on the computer. Some of those files she moved were referenced in Dan’s presentation software.

See the problem?

Yep. You guessed it. Moving the files broke the reference his application needed to find them, so when Dan tried to call them up in his presentation, he got the dreaded screen.

There are a couple solutions we recommend you use to help avoid experiences like these, but hopefully, this article gives you a better idea of how managing documents works in most trial preparation and presentation applications.

Have you seen the “No Image Available” picture come up during a presentation? What did you do to get through it?

Let us know on social media! You can connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Learn more about TrialDirector and how it can help you by visiting our website. Already have TrialDirector? Consider participating in one of our training courses.

Best Practices for Getting Documents into Trial Presentation Software

TrialDirector isn’t just a trial presentation tool. It also serves as a sort of document management system that helps you keep track of relevant case items and information throughout the whole trial process. We want to help you know how to use this and other tools to their full potential.

Business team
Take your trial presentation software to its full potential.

One of the first steps when using TrialDirector or any other trial presentation and evidence management software is to import relevant case items into whatever tool you are using. However, the information you provide along with the evidence you are importing determines whether you will have an easy or hard time as the case progresses.

Most trial presentation software use a database reference files on your computer and help you keep track of the information related to each evidence item. Following are our suggestions to consider when importing documents into the software to make your life easier as the case progresses and as you prepare for trial.

Only Bring In What You Need

First, you want to think about scaling down the number of documents you want to import. Any given case potentially has thousands, even tens of thousands, of documents. You’re not going to use every single piece of that evidence even before or during trial.

We recommend you review and sift through your case documents and choose the documents you’ll actually be working with. Then, import those relevant documents into your trial preparation and presentation software.

If it helps to think in terms of numbers, If your case has 1000 documents, you should consider only importing about 100 documents. Roughly 10%. Much more than that, and you’ll have a difficult time working around all the documents you are not using.

Scaling down in this way makes for a much simpler experience when managing and prepping your files for trial.

As an example, think about what it would take to actually search for a needle in a haystack. How would you go about it? Would start picking through the hay one strand at a time? That is what many firms are forcing themselves to do by either working with physical documents or dumping all their case files haphazardly onto their computers. But if you break up and significantly reduce the amount of hay you would have to look through, it becomes much easier to find the needle (The file you’re looking for).

And don’t worry, you can always bring in more files later if needed.

Know What Your Documents Are Before You Import

This may seem like an obvious one, but it’s necessary. As we already mentioned, case loads get rather hefty. If you just dump a bunch files into your trial presentation software without really knowing what is going in there, it’s going to be that much harder to find things when you need them, especially when you’re working with limited time.

It pays to put in the work of knowing what your files are beforehand.

As you review, re-naming your documents can have just as much of an impact on your ability to find them as organizing them does.

For example, think of enthusiastic cat owners. However they got to have all those hundreds of cats, they’re here now, and the owners better have a good way of keeping track of them. That’s why the owners use simple, but creative names for each cat. That way, the owners and the cats don’t get confused when the owners call out for one of them to come.

We’ve seen some trial teams use long detailed descriptions for each of their documents. While it may feel that that will make it easier to find the documents in the future, it turns into a problem when you add 1000 other documents all with very descriptive names.

That’s like the cat owners naming each cat something like “the one with the frizzy fur, black spot, and gimp leg.” Not very efficient.

You are the cat owner. Your case documents are your cats.

We recommend you go through each document you plan to import into your trial prep tool and rename it something simple and easy to reference. The easiest thing to name each file is its exhibit number or bates number.

Team and Computer Organization

A common problem with many law firms is organizing all the files related to a case. When a firm receives images from a vendor, the firm might dump all the files they received into whatever folder they set up for the case on their computer without even looking through and organizing what they received. These folders are generally accessible to the entire firm which means all the files inside are subject to being moved around or even deleted by accident.

As mentioned before, TrialDirector uses a database to reference evidence files instead of actually housing the files in the program itself. There are several major advantages to using a database in this way, but one of the disadvantages is that if the file being referenced is moved or deleted, the database loses it and TrialDirector can’t find it.

As you’ve probably guessed or even experienced, this is a problem. Don’t get caught with your pants down in the middle of a trial.

Without the most basic organization rules, all the thousands of case files quickly become mixed up and hard to navigate. By rushing the process of getting files into a case, you are setting yourself up for a lot of headaches down the road and precious hours of wasted time.

Regardless of how well you think your firm is organized, consider the following suggestions:

  • Set some file organization rules in your firm. Even the simplest rules go a long way. Our general suggestion would be to set up your files so that you can easily know where to go to find what you’re looking for without having to dig through multiple folders just to get there.
  • Communicate the rules to everyone. Everyone involved in the case needs to know where each case is located and what is allowed to be moved around and what is not.
  • Create a separate, new case folder for each case, and only put the files related to that case into the folder.
  • Divide case files into two folders within the main case folder: Exhibits and Depositions. Dividing files into these folders makes it that much easier to find what you need quickly.
  • Copy the files to a new, separate case folder before sending them to TrialDirector or any other database or trial presentation program. Doing this will further mitigate any mistakes in moving or deleting files

This type of organization beforehand not only makes your life as a paralegal or attorney better in general, but it makes it easier when importing into trial presentation software.

Convert all your images into PDFs

We’ve said it once and we’ll say it again: PDFs make trial prep much easier.

Think of the PDF as a sort of universal language of all the other image file types out there.

Pretty much anyone can open a PDF file. So, if you have to give the file to the opposition or some other party in a case, you can avoid any back and forth that comes from that party not being able to open the file because you already gave them the PDF.

Sometimes courts require you to provide PDFs so you can get a head start there by converting all your files now.

PDFs are also generally easier to import and move around than other file types. They act as a sort of container. For example, one PDF file, even though it’s a single file, can hold many pages at once. So instead of having to move around or send a bunch of single page files, such as Tiffs or other image files, you can send one PDF file with all the pages contained inside.

Working with single page files carries its own set of headaches that we won’t get into detail here, but there is a little more involved when trying to get them into trial presentation software.

As an added bonus for PDFs, you have the option to reduce the file size with PDFs, making file transfers that much easier and quicker.

Conclusion

Do yourself a favor and simplify the way you work with documents by following these principles and using trial preparation and document management software.

What has helped you when using trial preparation and presentation software?

Let us know on social media! You can connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Learn more about TrialDirector and how it can help you by visiting our website. Already have TrialDirector? Consider participating in one of our training courses.

Plan to Plan for Trial with Trial Presentation Software

Do You Plan?

When you started law school you probably had some sort of plan. At the very least you planned to attend class, study, and graduate. Then came the bar exam which required another plan to study, prepare, and learn even more.

Have you made other plans? Run a marathon, lose weight, learn a new language, go on a safari?

Whatever the objective, whether personal or professional, it requires a plan. Some things take little planning and some take a lot.

Can you run a marathon without training first? Maybe, but it’s probably painful and there may be lasting (and negative) effects.

Can you lose 20 pounds overnight? If so, tell me how!

Is it possible to become fluent in a new language in a week? Well, this teenager did, but it isn’t the safest way.

And if you can go on a safari at this very moment, I’d like to switch places with you. But chances are you need to plan time off from work, renew your passport, find someone to watch the kids, book a flight, pack, and find a good safari guide.

It’s the same thing when you go to trial. Do you have a plan for that?

Do You Plan for Trial?

So, maybe it’s a little early and a trial is still a few months away. A few motions are pending and there’s a chance the case will settle. You don’t need to prepare for trial, right?

Benjamin Franklin said: “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”

Team Planning Meeting
Trial Presentation Software can help you

Everything you do on your case is preparation for something: you prepare pleadings and interrogatories; you prepare for depositions and hearings; you prepare for settlement negotiations. What about trial?

Start using trial presentation software like TrialDirector for more than presentation – use it to prepare and you’ll be ready to present.

With a tool like TrialDirector, you can load your case data and start organizing with workbooks, searching documents, and creating exhibit lists in Microsoft Word. Then generate reports in PDF that can be emailed or copied into court filings. These tools will help when you ultimately go to trial but can also be leveraged early for settlement talks, analysis, and strategy.

Wait, TrialDirector Is for More Than Presentation?

Yes! The best trial presentation software does more than present. When you start using TrialDirector before trial you help yourself and your case. Let me tell you how:

First, today the pressure is off, so you are learning TrialDirector while you work and prepare. When you take things in stages, they are much easier to understand and absorb.

Second, while you’re learning TrialDirector, you’re reviewing the evidence. Better yet, while you’re reviewing the evidence, you are learning TrialDirector. Here’s a quick example:

  • Do you need all documents regarding ethylene glycol in once place? Make a workbook, call it Ethylene Glycol, and file any documents in it.
  • Want to give these to an ethylene glycol expert? No problem, simply export the workbook to a PDF that you can print or email.

These are pretty simple things to do, but when you’re under the gun, the easiest things can seem overwhelming. When you start using TrialDirector for more than just presentation, you’ll be able to put it to use early and to your advantage.

Third, all the organization you do in TrialDirector today will help you prepare tomorrow: your Ethylene Glycol workbook also functions as a presentation folder so you don’t need to recreate it for trial purposes.

(A quick note: Workbooks are one of the easiest and most useful TrialDirector functions. Make as many as you need and name them anything you want. Also, the same document can be filed in multiple workbooks!)

TrialDirector is a three-birds-with-one-stone program. Actually, it’s a stone for many, many birds, but we want to keep this brief. And please note, we do not advocate violence against birds or any other creature. Only idioms.

What Should I Do?

Like vacation planning, living healthfully, and learning a new skill, using trial technology needs planning too.

Get TrialDirector now, before trial. Make your life easier and use it to plan and prepare for trial. Start loading your data. If you aren’t sure how, the time to learn is before the trial time-crunch. Right now, you have the luxury of time. Maybe not an abundance of time but, probably more now than when trial is one week or one month away. The urgency and stress of an impending trial date aren’t looming over you.

Also, consider attending a TrialDirector University training course. Extra time will be something you don’t have when the calendar flips to trial month.

What tools do you use to prepare for trial or other events in a case?

Let us know on social media! You can connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn.

Learn more about TrialDirector and how it can help you by visiting our website.

5 Things You Didn’t Know You Could Do with TrialDirector – Trial Presentation Software

Ipro Cloud

When you invest in software, do you ever wish it would do just a little more? On the other hand, have you ever found out something about the software you currently use that makes your job that much easier?

Attorney learning software
Sometimes you just need a few tips and tricks for the software you use.

Sometimes the tools you use every day do everything you want them to do, but you may not know it. It’s a simple matter of learning a few tips and tricks to get to what you need.

Here are five things that you may not know that you can do with TrialDirector, the leading trial presentation software.

1 – Make a single PDF of some, or all, of your case items

Your case has hundreds of exhibits and thousands of pages. What if you need to review documents with a witness, expert, or colleague? It is much easier to review, share, and annotate documents as PDFs.

TrialDirector provides a really easy way to make PDFs of your documents.

Create a workbook and add items from your case. All you have to do is drag and drop. Then, right click on the workbook and choose “Send Workbook Contents To…” and select “PDF File.”

You can choose to export to a single PDF or multiple files and whether to apply markups.

The apply markups option will place any highlights, arrows, stamps, labels, etc…onto the PDF image. This is incredibly important and useful if you have redactions.

That’s it! Now you can save much more time as you review and prepare your case.

2 – Redact documents to keep private things private

Privileged information and private data are probably peppered throughout the evidence. You need to redact the information to protect you, your client, and your case.

Did you know TrialDirector lets you redact specific information from documents?

Not only that, but it lets you customize the redactions too. Choose white or black; with a border or without a border; labeled as “Redacted” or blank. Set your preferences in the Options area and they will apply to all redactions in your case.

To apply a redaction, open your annotation toolbar and select the Redact tool. Using your mouse, click, drag, and place the redaction on the desired areas. At this point, you’ll see the redaction is grayed over and you can still view the underlying image. This is helpful to you in the event you want to see the underlying text. However, when this image is printed or displayed in the presentation view, the redaction will display as white or black however you set it in your preferences.

There are times you will want to apply a redaction permanently. You can use TrialDirector for this too. Apply the redaction in the same manner as above. Next, make a PDF of the item(s) and apply the markups (see #1!) to the new file. Now you can send the redacted image(s) anywhere, and since the redaction was applied permanently to the new file, it cannot be removed.

3 – Use transcript search results in filings and other documents

You’re probably familiar with searching transcripts in TrialDirector. (In case you’re not: go to the Search tab in Transcript Manager, enter your word or phrase, choose any or all your transcripts, and click search…the results are displayed and you can expand them to see context! ßThat’s a bonus tip!).

“Great,” you might say, “but I want to include some of these in my motion. What good is it here?”

Use the Print function to create a PDF or “Print to File” to create a Word document. From there, you can copy and paste whatever you need into any document you like. You can then save your file so you can email, print, and share it with anyone you choose.

4 – Make pre-annotated presentations with Save Stage

Wait, what? Are we going the theater? Courtrooms may contain drama, but no, that’s not what we mean by “Save Stage”.

We think of the presentation display as a stage where you show your case. Often, you start with a blank or empty stage and present one item at a time. But there are times you want to show a detailed combination of a variety of types of evidence: perhaps zoom in on two sentences of a multi-page contract, play a video deposition clip, and show a picture all at the same time.

Presentation-Save-Stage
Use Save Stag to show a pre-built screen during your presentation.

TrialDirector can easily handle this number of actors on the screen, but you don’t want to set it up in front of the jury or on-the-fly. It would take precious seconds and the jury might get impatient.

Instead, impress the jury by creating the exact presentation display of your three items ahead of time. When you set up the presentation screen beforehand, choose Save Stage from the presentation tool bar. Like performers taking places before the curtain rises, the stage is saved exactly as you designed. When you are in court, just select the saved stage you created and begin.

The jury sees what you want, when you want with no muss and no fuss. It holds their attention without wasting anyone’s time during trial. Now that’s impressive!

5 – Use TrialDirector and TrialDirector for iPad together

It’s the best of both worlds: the power and storage of a laptop alongside the convenience of an iPad.

We love the freedom and comfort that the iPad provides, so we created TrialDirector for iPad. It’s a slimmed-down version of TrialDirector and gives you great functionality.

But what about the unexpected events at trial? What happens when you need to find that previously inadmissible document? How can you find and present it quickly and efficiently? This is one example where the strength of a PC or laptop comes in. All that processing power makes it easy to search for and present that now all-important document.

TrialDirector and TrialDirector for iPad
Use TrialDirector and TrialDirector for iPad together for all your needs in the courtroom.

Use TrialDirector and TrialDirector for iPad together. For scripted, no-deviation style presentation like an opening statement or closing argument, the iPad is a great fit. But for questioning witnesses, searching for items, and creating a dynamic and commanding visual, stick with the power of the full version of the software.

In TrialDirector, you can make a TrialDirector for iPad workbook, place your items inside and export. You can also import case items into the iPad app using Dropbox, iTunes, BoxSync, or OneDrive.

Here’s a bonus to using the software and app together: the iPad automatically sorts everything alpha-numerically. But, do you want to present things alphabetically or in the order you set? When you use the TrialDirector for iPad workbook, TrialDirector for iPad will retain the organization structure you set so items will present in the order you want.

Conclusion

It’s easy to get used to using something for one purpose and stay inside a comfort zone. With a little training and creativity, TrialDirector is more than presentation…it’s your trial preparation and presentation solution.

What tips have helped you be more efficient during case management or have helped you create your best trial presentations?

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Learn more about TrialDirector and how it can help you by visiting our website. Already have TrialDirector? Consider participating in one of our training courses.