Tag Archives: Controlling Legal Costs

AI in eDiscovery: Expectations vs. Reality

AI in eDiscovery

AI in eDiscovery: Expectations vs. Reality

For the last decade, the term Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been used quite a lot in the eDiscovery industry, with many at this point feeling like it’s more hype than technological innovation. This sense of hollow promises was added to recently when a former employee of Hanzo filed a lawsuit claiming that “the company would manually input the investigation results into its customer portal to create the false appearance that they were generated by artificial intelligence,” because the company’s AI platform was not functioning, [while] “senior Hanzo officials repeatedly warned the plaintiff not to tell clients about the manual investigations.”

So if they were faking AI results, does that mean everyone claiming they’re using it in eDiscovery is lying? Not in the least! But it does raise the need to define what is (and isn’t) Artificial Intelligence within eDiscovery as a way to cut through the noise.

Expectations vs. Reality – AI in eDiscovery

There are a lot of claims of “Artificial Intelligence” in the market, but when people hear the term AI, they often think of science-fiction, with robots doing the work that humans had done before. For further insights on the reality of legal AI, Robert Cruz, eDiscovery Hosting Support Consultant at RVM Enterprises, offers some considerations:

“The chatter of the eDiscovery industry lies within the offerings and solutions of ‘AI.’ For most, AI is envisioned from movies like The Terminator, iRobot, Transcendence, Stepford Wives, Blade Runner, and The Matrix. These are illustrations of what true AI would be. But defining AI has been more complex due to companies lowering the bar of what is considered AI.

“In eDiscovery, the industry has been focused on machine learning (predictive coding/technology assisted review), which is a subset of AI. To add to the soup of applications, Natural Language Processing (NLP) and Automated Speech Recognition (ASR) are also in vogue in the industry. However, companies have been selling magic shows with these three applications without illustrating the limitations of the math.

“Nothing will replace the human understanding of language. These 3 applications of AI do not have the capabilities to understand the nuances of human speech dynamics (Morphology, Phonology, Accents, Colloquial terms and Vernacular, Heteronyms). For Technology Assisted Review (TAR), NLP, and ASR, these applications rely on rules to function, and these applications fall short of ‘true AI’ since the rules have to be bent or broken to capture the same meaning between two different languages (which is the role of human translators).

“Heteronyms provide a unique problem when translating. For example: ‘The farm was cultivated to produce produce.’ In my current state of typing, MS Word flagged that sentence as a grammatical error and cannot suggest any corrections!

“So, these current uses of AI in legal (TAR, NLP, ASR) will have greater usage in other areas where automation is governed by rules and speeds up the process for more administrative tasks. For language and speech, we are nowhere near True AI.”

Robert Cruz, eDiscovery Hosting Support Consultant at RVM Enterprises

What is the Future of Legal AI?

The world of technology is constantly changing (for example, it wasn’t so long ago that Netflix was sending DVDs to people through the postal service) so it can be hard to predict what the future may hold for AI. In the legal industry, it can be even more difficult, because, on the one hand you have technological innovation, and on the other, you have whether users will adapt to that innovation.

One of the biggest reasons legal teams may be slow to adapt to the latest breakthroughs, is that, first and foremost, the outcomes have to be defensible. Add this to the fact that AI has primarily been focused on the Review stage of eDiscovery, and it’s easy to see why robot lawyers haven’t swept in and taken over document review.

There’s no doubt that advances will continue in that area (Continuous Active Learning or CAL is already taking its place on the scene), but the future of AI in eDiscovery will likely fall outside of the review stage. Aaron Swenson, Director of Product at Ipro, says it well: “In Legal, you don’t want the AI doing the work for you. You want it to help you ask the right questions, show you insightful trends in the data.”

A good analogy of this is spellcheck and grammar software. It’s been around for quite a while now, but (thankfully) we still need human writers. However, those tools are a great help to a writer. On the other hand, autocorrect (where the computer takes an active role in writing) can be disastrous without human review.

A recent article highlights how AI using word relationships in published scientific papers was able to make discoveries more quickly than humans. A similar use of entity relationships could prove very useful in helping attorneys make connections in large datasets that would be extremely difficult with purely manual review. AI could also help with Assisted Redaction, which could then be QC’d by both software and humans.

The main thing to consider when it comes to Artificial Intelligence within eDiscovery is that it isn’t here to replace lawyers, paralegals, and litigation support personnel. But it can and does and will continue to streamline and assist them in their work of getting to the facts of a case in a just, speedy, and inexpensive manner.

 

AI in eDiscovery, by Ipro

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Hybrid eDiscovery: How This Unique Cloud Deployment Can Free You from the Burdens of On-Prem Without Forcing You To AWS

hybrid cloud ediscovery

What Does the Capital One Hack Reveal About Hybrid Cloud eDiscovery?

Most of us are already aware of the arrest of Paige Thompson, a Seattle resident and former Amazon Web Services (AWS) employee, who was taken into FBI custody earlier this week for hacking Capital One and exposing personal data of more than 100 million customers. According to Israeli security firm CyberInt, other organizations including Vodafone, Ford, Michigan State University, and the Ohio Department of Transportation may have also fallen victim to the same hack.

AWS is sometimes referred to as the most secure cloud environment in the world and is the only company that has received the highest-level Defense Department IT certification, known as Impact Level 6, which allows it to handle top-secret data. That advantage stems in large part from a $600 million contract with the CIA that was awarded in 2013.

Hack and data breach may seem interchangeable as terms, but in actuality, they are different, and it’s that difference that may affect who is liable. A hack is an intentional attack perpetrated by a malicious actor who gains unauthorized access to a protected system (e.g. computer, server) in order to steal private information or hold the system ransom. A data breach occurs when data that is unintentionally left vulnerable in an unsecured environment is viewed by someone who shouldn’t have access to that data. The question here is whether the liability lies with Capital One and a misconfigured database within the AWS environment or with AWS because a former employee may have used credentials to access the cloud and/or knowledge of the misconfigurations.

Many eDiscovery solutions host their platforms, along with users’ case data, on public clouds like AWS and Azure, which might lead some to question the security of cloud-based eDiscovery. First, it’s important to remember that the Capital One hack (or is it breach? Or both?) had nothing to do with security certificates (after all, they have an Impact Level 6 certification), but an attack conducted by someone with inside knowledge.

But it is an opportunity to review the notion of “Cloud eDiscovery” and note that there isn’t a single environment that everything is operating in, but instead many options when it comes to choosing a cloud hosted platform.

Public Cloud (AWS, MS Azure):

In a public cloud, all infrastructure exists in the data centers of the cloud service provider. Each user then has a private environment within the larger public ecosystem, while the cloud host has physical control of the hardware and is responsible for all aspects of data security, IT management, and support.

Sounds good right? Except these public clouds aren’t just used for eDiscovery. They’re used for everything. Case data is in the same cloud as Capital One, Ford Motors, MSU, and ODOT (and others). And while the cloud provider is in charge of data security, IT management, and support (which is a definite plus), they aren’t specialists in eDiscovery, and they aren’t the same people who created the eDiscovery software that is being hosted in their cloud. So it adds additional stakeholders.

Private Cloud (AKA, On-Prem):

In lieu of some of the issues mentioned above, an organization may want more control over their environment and set up a dedicated, private network located either on-premise or at a remote site. Many times, when eDiscovery vendors talk about an “On-Prem” deployment, they may actually mean installing the solution on the user’s private cloud.

This definitely brings control of eDiscovery data wholly onto the organization, which is an added benefit from a security and control standpoint. However, for many, the burden of having to maintain an in-house system is heavy. Managing upgrades to software as well as hardware, while trying to recover costs, maintaining an IT team that understands the needs of the legal department, while being challenged with the ability to scale in the face of ever-growing datasets, as well as the liability of securing against hacks and data breaches, can be draining on both personnel and financial resources.

Hybrid eDiscovery: The Ipro Cloud

If only there was a hybrid of the two eDiscovery cloud options, one with the scalability and easy management of a public cloud, but with the control and security of a private cloud. And even better, what if that cloud was created and managed by people who not only understand the unique needs of eDiscovery but are dedicated to you?

That’s not just any cloud, but the Ipro Cloud. It gives you the flexibility to run your own environment on a private cloud managed by the creators of the eDiscovery software you’re using. Ipro teams speak the same language as your legal team and act as your eDiscovery dedicated IT department.

With Hybrid eDiscovery in Ipro’s Cloud, you also get the scalability of a public cloud with the control and security of a private cloud, utilizing Ipro’s decades of IT and industry experience running and operating the largest of client-environments. Unlike large public clouds, the only data hosted here is related to eDiscovery, all housed in a state-of-the-art data center with limited employee access to sensitive data, as well as a lower profile when it comes to targeted hacks. And hosting fees on the Ipro Cloud are a fraction of those on public clouds.

While you can secure and fully manage your own environment in the Ipro Cloud, you also get the benefit of a true technology partner Ipro’s hybrid approach. Ipro’s services team has been in your shoes and know the pain points and urgency of eDiscovery. Clients return again and again, because we specialize in building customized workflows for both simple and complex cases, while using our technology and advanced analytics to speed up processes through review with a focus on delivering quality results.

Proven Client Success:

Ipro is a 30-year legal technology veteran and hosts some of the biggest corporations and law firms in its cloud. One of them is Chamberlain Hrdlicka, a diversified business law firm with offices in Atlanta, Houston, Philadelphia, and San Antonio. In a recent case study, they said, “The Ipro eDiscovery Suite ultimately improved our firm’s ability to produce higher quality, streamlined reviews and provided the flexibility to handle cases of any size. Using Ipro, we were able to increase caseload by hosting over 330 cases and 40TB of data, while still working fewer hours and maintaining a small team. The workflows are well thought out and the system is intuitive to use, which minimized the learning curve for our technical staff, support personnel and attorneys as they adopted the system.”

 

How to Turn eDiscovery into Baby Carrots: 5 Models for Recovering your Law Firm’s eDiscovery Costs

ediscovery costs

It’s not uncommon for companies to look for ways to turn losses into profits, and the baby carrot, of all things, is a perfect example of this. California carrot farmer Mike Yurosek came up with the idea for the baby carrot in 1986 after growing tired of discarding a significant percentage of his crop due to imperfections. Using an industrial green bean cutter and a potato peeler, he created the original “baby-cut” carrot, and as a direct result carrot consumption in the US more than doubled over the next 15 years. But eDiscovery costs aren’t produce. Most law firms see it as a cost they simply have to absorb. Others will outsource eDiscovery work and pass the bill on to the client. However, with the right cost recovery tactics, the litigation support team can become one of the most profitable divisions in the firm or agency, essentially turning a cost center into a profit center.

5 Models for Recovering eDiscovery Costs for Law Firms

The following analysis was created by polling a sample set of law firms from medium and large markets across the United Sates. For the majority, turning their investment into a profit center isn’t necessarily the goal; however, they do want to recover the investment made in the software and infrastructure required for eDiscovery work.

To clarify, eDiscovery in this case refers to:

  • ECA (ingestion for mass analysis and culling of data prior to review)
  • Review (on-line searching, tagging, coding, analytics, TAR, etc.)
  • Processing and Production (conversion to TIFF or PDF, if needed, with endorsements)

eDiscovery software is just one component for which firms wish to recover cost. Additionally, there
is hardware, backups, IT, Database Administrators, support staff, and 3rd party software if hosted by the firm. If a firm decides to go the Managed Services or IaaS route, then there are monthly costs associated with storage and machine rentals which firms wish to recover.

The concepts below are listed in no particular order. In some instances, combinations of the concepts can be used.

Concept 1

The Traditional (Hourly Billing Only)

  • $10/hr – $25/hr = Machine Time
  • $100/hr = Tech Time
  • $150/hr = Project Management Time
  • $10/GB – $25/GB for ongoing storage (a few firms charged for storage, while others did not)

Concept 2

The Ingester (Bill for Ingestion of Data Only)

  • $150/GB = Data ingestion
  • One flat fee for any data brought into their system, no additional fees for: culling, processing, productions, storage, etc.

*One firm with on-prem enterprise software recouped their initial year 1 spend within 3 months of implementation of this model

Concept 3

The Vault (Storage Billing Only)

  • $20/GB/moth = Data storage

That’s it, one flat fee for any data stored by the firm; no additional fees for ingestion, culling, processing, productions, user fees, etc.

*One firm who has enterprise software in an IaaS turned this model into a profit center for them; they are now considering lowering their storage costs further.

Another firm polled wanted to move to this model (although at a lower cost) simply to combat their growing storage concerns and were less concerned about the initial up-front work considered the cost of doing business for internally-kept projects.

Concept 4

Bill Like a Service Provider

Pre-Processing and Culling

  • $50/GB – $150/GB = Data ingestion and indexing (some firms gave this away and only charged for data promoted into review after initial culling)
  • $25/GB = Culling of data (only one firm sampled charged for this; all others included the culling at no cost)
  • $50/GB – $150/GB = Data promoted to review after ingestion and culling (the firms that charged in this area typically didn’t charge for the initial ingestion of data; if they did, it was in the $10/GB – $25/GB range)

Review

  • $75/user – $125/user = Monthly license costs for review software (about half the firms sampled did not charge for these licenses)
  • $5/GB – $35/GB for ongoing storage (a few firms charged for this, some did not charge any storage)
  • $50/GB – $150/GB = Analytics technologies applied (near dupe, email threading, concept indexing, cluster and category creation a few firms only charged machine time for the Analytics indexing) 
  • $75/GB – $200/GB = TAR technologies applied (a few firms only charged machine time for the TAR indexing)

Processing and Production

  • $100/GB – $350/GB = Processing s (conversion of native file to TIFF or PDF)
  • $0.05/document – $0.15/document = Production
  • OR – $0.02/page – $0.05/page = Production

Concept 5

Bill Like a Service Provider, Take 2

One firm sampled told us they go out every year and poll the local, regional, and national vendors for pricing and services in each market. Then, they compare the pricing and services gathered with the firm’s services offered and average the pricing across-the-board.

Once the firm has calculated the averages, they reduce the average price by 50% before presenting the eDiscovery costs to their corporate clients. They also make the point that IP protected by keeping data on their systems, and if help is needed from other people or parties, they can securely access the environment through the web to assist with services or managed review.

Conclusion:

As the eDiscovery space becomes more and more competitive with corporations bringing operations in-house, growing datasets, and the complexity of new data sources, alternative billing models could give mid-size to large law firms a chance to offset or even reverse costs associated with eDiscovery.

It’s easy to get caught up in a “we’ve always done it this way” mentality. Then again, I’m sure no one imagined the cut-and-peeled nub of a misshapen carrot could change the agriculture industry.  

 

Written by Jim Gill
Content Writer, Ipro

Ipro Case Study with Chamberlain Hrdlicka

Challenge:

With a thriving practice, the burden of growing discovery volumes was challenging to manage. Chamberlain Hrdlicka had adopted litigation document review, processing, and transcript management software years earlier; however, with exponential growth in client data volumes, the limitations of that software became glaringly evident. They experienced performance and workflow issues on many cases, resulting in a great deal of stress on human resources. As a result, they set out to optimize the firm’s litigation software technology.

Their goals when searching for a new e-discovery solution for the firm and their 125 attorneys were to:

  • Increase ingestion speed by utilizing a distributed computing
  • Improve reviewer efficiency and precision for their legal
  • Reduce stress on their eDiscovery team

Prior to the implementation of the Ipro eDiscovery Suite, they found themselves working nights and weekends waiting for documents to upload into review. Their eDiscovery group could only take on so much work due to the time it took to prepare for review and prepare productions.

Solution

The Ipro eDiscovery Suite provided their firm with powerful processing, review and production capabilities “unlike any we’ve had before,” which allows them to give clients the relevant data they need at quicker speeds. “We’re able to maximize the integrated platform to quickly ingest, cull and search data collections, taking advantage of the advanced analytics features for e-mail threading, deduping, automated clustering and converting relevant documents to TIFF while the review is still in progress.” Chamberlain Hrdlicka

Prior to using Ipro, the process to review a current caseload would require a much larger team of reviewers; now, they can accomplish the same task in less time with significant cost savings. They can conduct a high-level ECA (Early Case Assessment) once the documents are into the review platform to know if there are gaps and whether they have everything they need for the case. The Ipro eDiscovery Suite has allowed them to handle large, intricate cases on a routine basis while mitigating significant impact to their attorneys’ workload. Despite the relatively small team, Chamberlain Hrdlicka can now optimize efficiency and productivity through the use of state-of-the-art technology, setting themselves apart from other firms—both large and small.

Benefits

“The addition of Ipro revolutionized how we work, what services we provide, and the number of resources required to get the work done. Upon implementation, Ipro led us to create a service provider model within our firm, allowing us to save time, resources and money and serve our clients in a more meaningful way.” Chamberlain Hrdlicka

The Ipro eDiscovery Suite ultimately improved the firm’s ability to produce higher quality, streamlined reviews and provided the flexibility to handle cases of any size. Using Ipro, they were able to increase their caseload by hosting over 330 cases and 40TB of data, while still working fewer hours and maintaining a small team. “The workflows are well thought out and the system is intuitive to use, which minimized the learning curve for our technical staff, support personnel and attorneys as they adopted the system.” Chamberlain Hrdlicka

They can offer their clients confidence in what the review process will cost. There won’t be any surprise expenses associated with using a third-party vendor or data hosting fees. They continue to leverage Ipro’s advanced technology to provide innovative, defensible and cost-effective eDiscovery and litigation support services. They can reduce client costs through increased productivity and reduced complexity, rather than by discounting rates.

To learn more about Ipro’s eDiscovery suite and how it can work for you, contact us or visit our website for more information.

 

About Chamberlain Hrdlicka

Chamberlain Hrdlicka is a diversified business law firm with offices in Atlanta, Houston, Philadelphia and San Antonio. The firm represents both public and private companies, as well as individuals and family-owned businesses across the nation. The firm offers counsel in tax planning and tax controversy, corporate, securities and finance, employment law and employee benefits, energy law, estate  planning and administration, intellectual property, international and immigration law, commercial and business litigation, real estate and construction law.

https://www.chamberlainlaw.com/

 

About Ipro Tech, LLC

Simplifying the Process from Discovery to Trial

Ipro is a global leader in eDiscovery technology used by legal professionals to streamline discovery of electronic data through presentation at trial. Ipro draws upon decades of innovation to deliver high-performance software solutions and services that significantly reduce the cost and complexity of eDiscovery.

https://iprotech.com

 

Do Your Numbers Survive the Tank?

With almost all marketing associated with eDiscovery, Law Firms, Providers and Software companies alike tout that an advantage of using Acme Company is “Efficiency,” but how are people measuring efficiency? A year ago, at our Ipro Innovations conference, we had a breakout session where we posed the question “Do you know your cost per GB?” Of the 40 or so attendees at that session, not a single person raised their hand. Unfortunately, I don’t think anyone was surprised by that non-reaction. Yet here we are claiming “I am the most efficient person in all the land”.

For those who know me, I am an avid fan of the show Shark Tank. I am always impressed by how well prepared the “Pitchers” are with being able to regurgitate their numbers- cost per unit, cost to ship, if we can get a bigger Purchase Order we can use a manufacturer that will drop the price per unit by $0.32. Why can’t our industry do the same? Do we care? Is the pricing model too convoluted? Is it impossible to calculate all the factors? Project Management, Software, Hardware, Storage, Technicians, to name a few. Everyone states that pricing is a “Race to the Bottom,” so there is more pressure on companies involved with hosting to be as aggressive as possible on pricing.

But if efficiency is truly important and a market differentiator, shouldn’t it be emphasized from the top down? When speaking with Chief Officers, Directors and others involved with the bottom line they are interested in how to become efficient. Experience tells us, that’s where the discussion stops. When a company is looking to evaluate a new solution, tool or workflow, the details are usually handed off to an analyst of some sort to go through a spreadsheet of some “374” line items of features they must test. Rarely in my experience have I seen a spreadsheet like this contain something associated with “efficiency.” More importantly, if the analyst decrees that the solution they are evaluating doesn’t have “27” items they want then that solution is deemed a non-solution. But wait, what if a solution allowed you to gain 32% more efficiency overall and those items deemed as non-starters only pertain to 6% of your projects. Does the 32% efficiency on the 94% outweigh the 6%? Do you have a way to calculate that information? Shouldn’t it be weighed? Does the analyst have any guidance as to how to measure that?

I was talking to a CTO just a few weeks back after Legal Week in New York, and we were both lamenting the perception that our industry is so unique we can’t treat our businesses like others outside our industry. Business is business is business, and if you don’t know your numbers, how can you make decisions on pricing, staffing, ROI, TCO? How do you teach your staff about the importance of efficiency? Data sizes are not going down, but pricing is. Wouldn’t the ultimate goal be to do more with the same? With outsiders starting to take an active interest in the direction of eDiscovery maybe it’s time to start paying attention to more than the top line revenue and EBITDA alone. And for some, how do you get an offer from one of the Sharks?

3 Ways to Control eDiscovery Costs

Control eDiscovery Costs

eDiscovery Costs: The Big Picture

There’s no “magic bullet” that will fractionalize eDiscovery costs, but that’s not to downplay the importance of chipping away at them. According to Norton Rose Fulbright’s 2016 Litigation Trends Annual Survey, on average litigation spend can account for at least 0.1 percent of revenue for companies worldwide. And because discovery can eat up more than 50 percent of the cost of litigation, it’s understandable that respondents were wary of eDiscovery spending:

“A significant proportion of respondents talked about the costs and resource implications of eDiscovery and how it was growing out of proportion to the benefits gained.”

—Norton Rose Fulbright’s 2016 Litigation Trends Annual Survey

But rather than considering this a negative, it’s important to see the big opportunity: you can become a hero to your organization by leaning out expenditures on eDiscovery. Empowering you to seize that opportunity is what drives innovation here at Ipro Tech. Let’s take a look at three ways you can save eDiscovery dollars by spending wisely and reducing the amount of time, people and errors involved in the process.

Understand the Scope of Your Data

In the book E-Discovery: An Introduction to Digital Evidence, you’ll find an important (if not common-sense) assertion: “E-discovery costs can inflate rapidly when investigators haven’t planned the discovery’s scope carefully…”

Be fully aware of what it’s going to take to get through your data, and then make sure you have the right resources in place to handle the job. It’s incredibly stressful — not to mention expensive — when you’re left at a standstill because your technology or personnel aren’t enough to get it done.

You can save a substantial amount of money simply by shopping around, rather than scrambling to add resources at the last minute.

stressful ediscovery costs

Automate Key Steps of Your Workflow

With the advent of new eDiscovery technology, such as Ipro’s ADD Automated Digital Discovery® platform, it’s becoming possible to get more done with fewer touches. For example, you no longer need staff dedicated to pushing batches through your workflow. Streaming technology can automatically move data, for example, between processing and review applications — creating a dynamic feed of documents without long waits for each batch.

Fewer human touches not only saves you time, it can drastically cut down those errors which are, frankly, unavoidable with people handling data. To further simplify the process, some of the newest eDiscovery technology includes an easy-to use interface that lets anyone with user permissions upload data to your workflow. You can also find features that help you establish chain of custody, and create numerous types of reports.

Leverage Cloud-based Resources

As we’ve discussed before, leveraging cloud-based resources for eDiscovery can provide a huge competitive advantage. For starters, you avoid the significant expenses involved with IT personnel and infrastructure. Many of today’s most customer-centric technology providers stay on the leading edge with offerings such as software (SaaS) and infrastructure (IaaS) as services.

Savings aren’t the only advantages of moving to the cloud. Because you can add resources as needed, without long-term commitments, you can take on larger (and more lucrative) matters without maintaining the resources needed to handle them. The cloud also removes many technological headaches, leaving you free to focus on litigation.

The Ipro Cloud is one option here, and Ipro has developed a network of more than 400 service providers who offer our software via their own hosting platforms.

Get Answers Today

If you have any questions about the material in this post, please don’t hesitate to contact Ipro Tech. An experienced eDiscovery professional is standing by ready to deliver the answers you need.

Top 4 Reasons for Moving to Cloud eDiscovery

move cloud ediscovery

The first time I saw someone with a netbook, I have to admit thinking, “Who in the world would want a computer that can only connect to the Internet? What about all your files and applications?” That skepticism didn’t last long, though, especially after I saw the price of netbooks — and spent an entire day lugging my 2000s-era laptop around various airport terminals. It’s fair to say experiences like mine helped cloud computing catch on as quickly as it has.

But in some industries folks aren’t so quick to fall in love with the latest technology, and law is certainly one of them. That means early adopters of new legal technology — when it eventually proves essential — will hold significant advantages over those who maintain wait-and-see attitudes. Cloud eDiscovery is a perfect example. With that in mind, I’d like to present what are (in my humble opinion) four of the biggest reasons for moving to a solution like the Ipro Cloud.

1. Cloud eDiscovery Saves You Big Money

Technical resources like servers and IT personnel are expensive, but you entirely avoid those costly outlays when they’re the responsibility of your cloud provider. In fact, many of today’s most customer-centric technology providers are also creating new pricing models — usually tailored to your business needs, as an enticement — that allow you to avoid paying for something you don’t use.

2. Cloud eDiscovery Lets You Focus on Litigation

Let’s be honest: you can only get so much done in a day, and it takes lots of time to learn new stuff. If you’ve put decades toward becoming one of the best in your field, why learn how to be an IT guy? Cloud eDiscovery removes not only much of the cost of technology, but also most of the headaches that come with configuring and maintaining it. You just focus on what you do best… litigation.

3. Cloud eDiscovery Makes You More Nimble

With the ability to add software and infrastructure as needed, you’re free to grow your business in real time, without being handcuffed to projected growth. This business model, which effectively levels the playing field, is quickly catching on. In fact, Forbes estimates that worldwide spending on cloud services will have grown nearly 20 percent — to more than $141 billion — between 2015 and 2019.

4. Cloud eDiscovery Can Give You a Competitive Advantage

Let’s look at competition in the legal sphere like a foot race: If your competitor maintains that wait-and-see attitude while you confidently move forward, it’s like taking off at a dead sprint while your opponent has yet to get past the starting line. If I haven’t convinced you by now, perhaps it’d be best to leave you with some thoughts from the Harvard Business Review:

As cloud services have matured and adoption has increased, research has consistently shown that using cloud has enabled companies to act more quickly and to collaborate more easily. This has conferred competitive advantage on early adopters.

Get Answers Today

If you have any questions about the material in this post, please don’t hesitate to contact Ipro Tech. An experienced eDiscovery professional is standing by ready to deliver the answers you need.