Tag Archives: eDiscovery How To

Tech Tip Tuesday: Pausing Jobs and How This Could Affect Deduplication in eCapture

Here’s a common situation that could cause problems when pausing jobs and a tip to prevent it.

When it comes to pausing jobs you should know the possible impact this could create with deduplication. In general, pausing a job will not impact anything with the job, but this can change depending on other jobs that are running or will be run. Here is an example of something that can happen:

We start a job called Job A. Then we pause Job A and start another job (Job B) in the same custodian.

We are de-duplicating at the custodian level.

Let’s say Job A has processed 10 files before it was paused, one of those files was found in Job B > Job B will list the item as a duplicate of the item in Job A.

Let’s let Job B finish and unpause Job A and let it finish

The last item in Job A was a duplicate of an item in Job B > Job A will deduplicate it out, keeping the item from Job B

In this case, both jobs have an item that was deduplicated from the other. Whichever job discovers the item first will be the reference, and all other jobs will mark their items as duplicates, even if one job finishes before the other or if a job is paused.

Starting jobs

 

Let’s go over another scenario:

Let’s start Job A and let it get through the same 10 documents again, then pause it

Now we will start Job B and let it finish. One of Job B’s items is a duplicate of one of the items in Job A that is done with processing and gets deduplicated

Now we delete Job A. What happens to the item in Job B? It still is marked as a duplicate, and will still be deduplicated.

Now we are in a problem where an item is getting marked as a duplicate despite the original job being deleted. Normally if we delete Job A before starting Job B, this wouldn’t cause a problem, but because the jobs were active at the same time, the jobs are now “linked” by their duplicate items, and deleting one job means potentially re-running the other.

Knowing this ahead of time in the event you need to pause a job will ensure nothing important to your review gets missed.

For more tips be sure to check out the Ipro Community page or visit Iprotech.com.

Tech Tip Tuesday: eCapture

eCapture

We polled our Support team and Ipro Community to find some common questions our product users had and the best resolution. Check back on Tuesdays for more tech tips to help you make the most of your Ipro investment.

Pausing Jobs and How This Could Affect Deduplication: eCapture

If you are ever in the situation where you need to pause a job in eCapture for some reason, then you should know the possible impact this could create with deduplication. In general, pausing a job will not impact anything with the job, but this can change depending on other jobs that are running or will be run. Here is an example of something that can happen:

We start a job called Job A. Then we pause Job A and start another job (Job B) in the same custodian.
We are de-duplicating at the custodian level.
Let’s say Job A has processed 10 files before it was paused, one of those files was found in Job B > Job B will list the item as a duplicate of the item in Job A.
Let’s let Job B finish and unpause Job A and let it finish
The last item in Job A was a duplicate of an item in Job B > Job A will deduplicate it out, keeping the item from Job B

In this case both jobs have an item that was deduplicated from the other. Whichever job discovers the item first will be the reference, and all other jobs will mark their items as duplicates, even if one job finishes before the other or if a job is paused. Let’s go over another scenario:

Let’s start Job A and let it get though the same 10 documents again, then pause it
Now we will start Job B and let it finish. One of Job B’s items is a duplicate of one of the items in Job A that is done with processing, and gets deduplicated
Now we delete Job A. What happens to the item in Job B? It still is marked as a duplicate and will still be deduplicated.

Now we are in a problem where an item is getting marked as a duplicate despite the original job being deleted. Normally if we delete Job A before starting Job B, this wouldn’t cause a problem, but because the jobs were active at the same time, the jobs are now “linked” by their duplicate items and deleting one job means potentially re-running the other.

For more tips, be sure to join our Ipro Community.

5 Must-Follow Best Practices for Implementing New eDiscovery Technology

new ediscovery technology

There’s no question any organization can benefit from new eDiscovery technology. However, it’s still important to keep in mind this requires more than just making a purchase. To fully reap all the benefits (and avoid disrupted productivity), there are best practices that an organization should keep in mind when bringing in the latest technology.

Because organizations today vary so much in size and scope, we will discuss a few of these best practices from a high level. There might be one or more practices specific to your own organization, but the following concepts are universal.

1. Outline Your Objectives

For starters, simply replacing your old products is not an adequate objective. Similarly, it’s not sufficient to implement new eDiscovery technology, then send out a company-wide email to announce it, and then hope your team adopts the new software. Instead, apply a project-management approach. Set tangible goals to define your success, e.g.:

  • Check Workflow Compatibility
  • Deploy Role-Specific Training
  • Perform Comprehensive Testing
  • Ensure Proper Migration

When you’re measuring concrete objectives against tangible metrics, determining success is less of a mystery. It also makes setting future objectives, which might depend on technology integration, much easier.

2. Check Workflow Compatibility

Most organizations are unique in the way individuals go about doing their jobs. New eDiscovery technology is usually deigned to mirror, from somewhat of a high level, these workflows. But don’t assume the technology on your short list will line up perfectly with your own workflow.

Many customer-focused providers — Ipro Tech, for example — will deploy professional teams to your location to ensure a successful integration. This can save you countless hours and resources, as it’s obviously a disruptive process to re-define current roles in order to accommodate new technology.

3. Deploy Role-Specific Training

Your team is made up of individuals with different responsibilities, and their day-to-day experiences with your new technology will vary greatly. It’s important to tailor training specifically to the objectives and challenges these individuals will face.

For example, it’s very unlikely someone in your administrative group will need to troubleshoot database connectivity. Conversely, nobody on your IT staff is going to be responsible for syncing up Bates numbers. Don’t dedicate too much time to training individuals beyond their day-to-day responsibilities, and don’t leave anyone with a knowledge gap that will hamper their productivity.

4. Perform Comprehensive Testing

Just like sending that companywide email to announce your technology launch, it’s not adequate to simply open up access to users and ask them to hunt for bugs. Instead you should employ a comprehensive search for specific shortcomings by applying established testing methods:

  • Organizational Testing — Audit your organization to ensure necessary resources are available, such as online training and technical manuals, people well versed in the new technology, and a forum or wiki for sharing information.
  • Feature Testing — Before you add to or modify your new technology, run features through likely scenarios to ensure users are prepared to have them in workflows.
  • Performance Testing — It’s important to be aware of your technology’s limitations, so deliberately attempt to max out its performance to discover those limits.

Testing, obviously, prepares your organization for any missteps that might occur once your technology is fully implemented. I can’t overstate how important it is to clear these obstacles in testing environment, rather than having them stumble through them during your real-world operations.

5. Ensure Proper Migration

Once your previous technology is completely phased out, it’s going to be very difficult (if not impossible) to recover any data phased out with it. Gain peace of mind you’re retaining any data you’ll eventually need by performing a full-scope migration for new eDiscovery technology. Think of this as a checklist reminding you to gather up important items like:

  • Historical Data — This often-archived data, when re-examined, can guide future efforts through insights into activity, contextual factors and trends.
  • User Information — Avoid duplicating setup tasks by checking information related to how individuals work within an environment.
  • Work Product — Perhaps most importantly, protect that critical data prepared specifically ahead of litigation.

With these data sources checked off, you can more confidently sunset the technology you’ve been using without worrying that critical resources are vanishing alongside it.

Get Answers Today

If you have any questions about the material in this post, please don’t hesitate to contact Ipro Tech. An experienced eDiscovery professional is standing by ready to deliver the answers you need.

3 Ways to Control eDiscovery Costs

Control eDiscovery Costs

eDiscovery Costs: The Big Picture

There’s no “magic bullet” that will fractionalize eDiscovery costs, but that’s not to downplay the importance of chipping away at them. According to Norton Rose Fulbright’s 2016 Litigation Trends Annual Survey, on average litigation spend can account for at least 0.1 percent of revenue for companies worldwide. And because discovery can eat up more than 50 percent of the cost of litigation, it’s understandable that respondents were wary of eDiscovery spending:

“A significant proportion of respondents talked about the costs and resource implications of eDiscovery and how it was growing out of proportion to the benefits gained.”

—Norton Rose Fulbright’s 2016 Litigation Trends Annual Survey

But rather than considering this a negative, it’s important to see the big opportunity: you can become a hero to your organization by leaning out expenditures on eDiscovery. Empowering you to seize that opportunity is what drives innovation here at Ipro Tech. Let’s take a look at three ways you can save eDiscovery dollars by spending wisely and reducing the amount of time, people and errors involved in the process.

Understand the Scope of Your Data

In the book E-Discovery: An Introduction to Digital Evidence, you’ll find an important (if not common-sense) assertion: “E-discovery costs can inflate rapidly when investigators haven’t planned the discovery’s scope carefully…”

Be fully aware of what it’s going to take to get through your data, and then make sure you have the right resources in place to handle the job. It’s incredibly stressful — not to mention expensive — when you’re left at a standstill because your technology or personnel aren’t enough to get it done.

You can save a substantial amount of money simply by shopping around, rather than scrambling to add resources at the last minute.

stressful ediscovery costs

Automate Key Steps of Your Workflow

With the advent of new eDiscovery technology, such as Ipro’s ADD Automated Digital Discovery® platform, it’s becoming possible to get more done with fewer touches. For example, you no longer need staff dedicated to pushing batches through your workflow. Streaming technology can automatically move data, for example, between processing and review applications — creating a dynamic feed of documents without long waits for each batch.

Fewer human touches not only saves you time, it can drastically cut down those errors which are, frankly, unavoidable with people handling data. To further simplify the process, some of the newest eDiscovery technology includes an easy-to use interface that lets anyone with user permissions upload data to your workflow. You can also find features that help you establish chain of custody, and create numerous types of reports.

Leverage Cloud-based Resources

As we’ve discussed before, leveraging cloud-based resources for eDiscovery can provide a huge competitive advantage. For starters, you avoid the significant expenses involved with IT personnel and infrastructure. Many of today’s most customer-centric technology providers stay on the leading edge with offerings such as software (SaaS) and infrastructure (IaaS) as services.

Savings aren’t the only advantages of moving to the cloud. Because you can add resources as needed, without long-term commitments, you can take on larger (and more lucrative) matters without maintaining the resources needed to handle them. The cloud also removes many technological headaches, leaving you free to focus on litigation.

The Ipro Cloud is one option here, and Ipro has developed a network of more than 400 service providers who offer our software via their own hosting platforms.

Get Answers Today

If you have any questions about the material in this post, please don’t hesitate to contact Ipro Tech. An experienced eDiscovery professional is standing by ready to deliver the answers you need.